western


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to western: Western Union

western

1. (of a wind, etc.) coming or originating from the west
2. Music See country and western

Western

1. of, relating to, or characteristic of the West as opposed to the Orient
2. (formerly) of, relating to, or characteristic of the Americas and the parts of Europe not under Communist rule
3. of, relating to, or characteristic of the western states of the US
4. a film, book, etc., concerned with life in the western states of the US, esp during the era of exploration and early development
References in classic literature ?
But besides the operation of its own wires, the Western Union was supplying customers with various kinds of printing-telegraphs and dial telegraphs, some of which could transmit sixty words a minute.
At once the Western Union awoke from its indifference.
And the Western Union, in the endeavor to protect its private lines, became involuntarily a bell-wether to lead capitalists in the direction of the telephone.
Two months after the Western Union had given its weighty endorsement to the telephone, these men organized a company to do business in New England only, and put fifty thousand dollars in its treasury.
Awful and threatening scowls darken the face of the West Wind in his clouded, south-west mood; and from the King's throne-hall in the western board stronger gusts reach you, like the fierce shouts of raving fury to which only the gloomy grandeur of the scene imparts a saving dignity.
And every nerve on the alert you watch for the clearing-up mood of the Western King, that shall come with a shift of wind as likely as not to whip all the three masts out of your ship in the twinkling of an eye.
Japan swiftly assimilated the Western ideas, and digested them, and so capably applied them that she suddenly burst forth, full- panoplied, a world-power.
Japan's officers reorganized the Chinese army; her drill sergeants made the mediaeval warriors over into twentieth century soldiers, accustomed to all the modern machinery of war and with a higher average of marksmanship than the soldiers of any Western nation.
She had transmuted Western culture and achievement into terms that were intelligible to the Chinese understanding.
On Japan's advice, in the beginning, she had expelled from the Empire all Western missionaries, engineers, drill sergeants, merchants, and teachers.
Jones was lately grown very intimate with Mr Western.
The reader, if he considers that this fellow was already obnoxious to Mr Western, and if he considers farther the weighty business by which that gentleman's displeasure had been incurred, will perhaps condemn this as a foolish and desperate undertaking; but if he should totally condemn young Jones on that account, he will greatly applaud him for strengthening himself with all imaginable interest on so arduous an occasion.