wet-bulb temperature


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wet-bulb temperature

[′wet ¦bəlb ′tem·prə·chər]
(meteorology)
Isobaric wet-bulb temperature, that is, the temperature an air parcel would have if cooled adiabatically to saturation at constant pressure by evaporation of water into it, all latent heat being supplied by the parcel.
The temperature read from the wet-bulb thermometer; for practical purposes, the temperature so obtained is identified with the isobaric wet-bulb temperature.

wet-bulb temperature

The temperature of a thermometer in which the bulb is enclosed in a wick that is kept moistened.

wet-bulb temperature

wet-bulb temperature
The lowest temperature at which air may be cooled by the evaporation of water at a constant pressure. It is measured with a wet-bulb thermometer.
References in periodicals archive ?
After numerous tests, it became clear that the measurement procedure was critical in order to obtain accurate and repeatable wet-bulb temperature measurement results.
relative humidity, specific volume, dry-bulb temperature, and wet-bulb temperature.
In LCAM 1E, the dew-point temperature at the peak dry-bulb temperature and mean coincident wet-bulb temperature was assumed to prevail through the day unless the dry-bulb temperature fell below the dew point.
25 in summer, depending on the ambient wet-bulb temperature.
wb,i] = wet-bulb temperature of the air entering the cooling coil in zone i ([degrees]C); [T.
Thus, scaling EWMA forecasts based on external wet-bulb temperature forecast extremes is generally not recommended, even with perfect prediction.
The unsorted lumber (L + M + H) was dried with a time-basis schedule consisting of an initial 6 hours warm-up ramp, seven successive steps in which dry-bulb and wet-bulb gradually increased every 24 hours, and a final step at a constant 78[degrees]C dry-bulb and 65[degrees]C wet-bulb temperature that ended when the average lumber MC was approximately 15 percent.
This results in a fictitious inlet wet-bulb temperature that is used to re-evaluate capacity and EIR with Equations 1 and 2.
We therefore determined that in order to minimize the impact of secondary climate variables, we would only use NARCCAP data pertaining to dry-bulb temperature, wet-bulb temperature, atmospheric pressure and corresponding atmospheric variables that could be calculated directly from these primary variables (e.
When air flows over a surface wetted with water, evaporation from the film of water will lower the temperature of the water-air interface toward the wet-bulb temperature of the air.
Water-side free cooling, which uses cooling tower water to cool the load without operating the compressor of the chillers when the ambient wet-bulb temperature is sufficiently low, does not have these limitations but does require special considerations to avoid the tower freezing during winter operation.