wet

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wet

1. rainy, foggy, misty, or humid
2. employing a liquid, usually water
3. Chiefly US and Canadian characterized by or permitting the free sale of alcoholic beverages
4. damp or rainy weather
5. Brit informal a Conservative politician who is considered not to be a hard-liner
6. Chiefly US and Canadian a person who advocates free sale of alcoholic beverages
7. the wet Austral (in northern and central Australia) the rainy season

wet

[wet]
(physics)
A liquid is said to wet a solid if the contact angle between the solid and the liquid, measured through the liquid, lies between 0 and 90°, and not to wet the solid if the contact angle lies between 90 and 180°.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though newspaper advertisements for wet nurses provide evidence that Northern whites did not accept cross-racial wet-nursing (Golden 73), Golden notes that the "Southern tradition of cross-race wet nursing in the antebellum years made race an unimportant qualification," yet because of the demographic composition of the labor market, many Southern whites employed African American wet-nurses (Golden 72-73).
Some women with a will to nurse and an ample supply of milk may have been prevented from doing so because of social norms which insisted on the use of a wet-nurse for certain classes of women.
as patrilineal interference, for in consigning the child to a wet-nurse,
How often were the children raised by the mother, by a wet-nurse, or in an orphanage?
He's a gifted 23-yearold, for God's sake, and the women in his life still want to wet-nurse him.
BetVictor go just 11-8 that Drogba is treated at least twice by the physio, and offer 3-1 that she's not called on to the pitch to wet-nurse the nancy boy.
26) In 1886, editors of the popular infant-care magazine, Babyhood, encouraged mothers who did not breastfeed to hire a wet nurse and quoted one physician who said, "A wet-nurse is a nuisance, but no one who has tried one will ever take any other way of bringing up a baby that she cannot suckle herself.
Parents who hired a wet-nurse were quite cautious and did so scrupulously.
Anybody looking for a wet-nurse has got the wrong person in me.
He will wet-nurse veteran Middlesex seam bowler Angus Fraser who, after 46 innings in Tests, boasts a batting average of 7.
This unassuming partnership breeds, rears, trains and wet-nurses all their own greyhounds, and considering they have sent out only 290 runners in the four years, their strike rate of 34 per cent is nothing short of miraculous.
This time, drawing on the work of social historians such as Lawrence Stone and Alan Macfarlane, she shows how, in the family domain, social arrangements such as swaddling and the hiring of wet-nurses, along with the high degree of bereavement, would be likely to make what Winnicott calls `false-self organization' prevalent in Herbert's day.