wettability


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wettability

[‚wed·ə′bil·əd·ē]
(chemistry)
The ability of any solid surface to be wetted when in contact with a liquid; that is, the surface tension of the liquid is reduced so that the liquid spreads over the surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords DMDHEU, Oil-heat-treated wood, Water borne coatings, Wettability, Wood modification
The main aim of the present study is to do the detailed characterization of the vitreous humor; its constituents including collagen and hyaluronic acid; silicone oil: the presently used substitute; and gellan gum as a possible substitute on the basis of ultrastructure, viscosity, wettability and gelation, and to approach the clinical issue of obtaining a vitreous substitute which will be free from the complications associated with presently available substitutes.
Keywords: wettability, contact angle, interfa cial tension, live crude oil, reservoir conditions
In addition to the roughness, the wettability is another parameter that contributes to determine the surface quality.
It may not be possible to study commercially available implants' surfaces and their influence on wettability.
The experimental results and values of wettability, Roughness, Self cleaning ability and Ice delaying property are discussed below.
Scientists at Oregon State University were able to develop cellulose nanofiber PtSb-based antifungal coatings which offer good wettability, flexibility, barrier and mechanical properties.
Effect of Plasma Surface Finish on Wettability and Mechanical Properties of SAC305 Solder Joints"
The PB3 Plasmabrush is used for applications such as cleaning/activation of metals, glass and plastics for optimum wettability of coatings, inks, etc.
HydraGlyde Moisture Matrix, Alcon's proprietary moisture technology, has been added to Air Optix contact lenses to deliver longer-lasting surface wettability for the wearer.
Wettability of a solid surface is a characteristic of materials governed by the surface chemical composition and the surface morphology.
We tested mechanisms of control of epibionts by pycnogonids in three ways: disabling their ovigers to prevent grooming, extracting wax layers from the cuticle, and measuring the wettability of the cuticle; however, none of these experiments affected epibiont coverage.