whaler


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whaler

1. a person employed in whaling
2. a vessel engaged in whaling
3. Austral a nomad surviving in the bush without working

whaler

[′wāl·ər]
(civil engineering)

wale, waler, whaler

A horizontal timber or beam used to brace or support an upright member, as sheeting, formwork for concrete, etc. (See illustration p. 1052.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Dave Morrell of Colwyn Bay with the19 stone bronze whaler shark he caught off a Namibian beach after a struggle lasting three-and-a-half hours - he giant fish was returned to the ocean alive
The waters off Greenland were among the places the Liverpool whalers hunted lucrative sperm whales and other species valuable for their oil-rich blubber and baleen -whalebone used for making ladies' corsets (stays).
For the first time in seven decades, with cheers and ceremony, the Makah welcomed whalers home.
Whalers anchored at Dent's Hole because of the depth of the river at that spot.
The high-seas face-off between Japanese whalers and Sea Shepherd was a rapid escalation of the annual contest between the fleet that carries out Japan's controversial whale hunt in Antarctic waters and conservationists who want the practice stopped.
Meanwhile, a sinister looking man-of-war vessel called the Vengeance was anchored a short distance away down-river, and scheming men on her deck squinted through spying glasses at the returning whaler, ready to give the signal to their vicious lackeys.
Of the diary, Tony says: "It is the only surgeon's journal we have from any North-East whaler from any period of the 19th Century.
Divers can only enter the water at the ramp at Whaler Cove.
IOupiat whaler and Diomede inhabitant, looks out at his village from the deck of the Arctic Sunrise and sighs.
And there's the fact that it inspired ``Moby Dick'' - Herman Melville, then a crew member on another whaler, read accounts by one of the few survivors and even met the captain of the doomed ship.