whelk


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

whelk,

large marine gastropodgastropod,
member of the class Gastropoda, the largest and most successful class of mollusks (phylum Mollusca), containing over 35,000 living species and 15,000 fossil forms.
..... Click the link for more information.
 snail found in temperate waters. The whelk is sometimes eaten, but when food is plentiful, fishermen frequently use it for bait. Whelks are scavengers and carnivores, equipped with an extensible proboscis, tipped with a filelike radula, with which they bore holes through the shells of crabs and lobsters, and a large, muscular foot with which they hold their victims. The thick-lipped, spiral shell has an uneven surface with many protuberances. The knobbed whelk, the largest species, ranging up to 16 in. (40.6 cm), and the channeled whelk, slightly smaller, are both found south of Cape Cod, Mass. In summer the strings of pale, disk-shaped egg cases are common along the shore. The whelk is sometimes mistakenly called conchconch
, common name for certain marine gastropod mollusks having a heavy, spiral shell, the whorls of which overlap each other. In conchs the characteristic gastropod foot is reduced in size and the operculum, a horny plate located on the foot and used to seal the shell opening
..... Click the link for more information.
. Whelks are classified in the phylum MolluscaMollusca
, taxonomic name for the one of the largest phyla of invertebrate animals (Arthropoda is the largest) comprising more than 50,000 living mollusk species and about 35,000 fossil species dating back to the Cambrian period.
..... Click the link for more information.
, class Gastropoda, order Neogastropoda.

whelk

[welk]
(invertebrate zoology)
A gastropod mollusk belonging to the order Neogastropoda; species are carnivorous but also scavenge.

whelk

1
any carnivorous marine gastropod mollusc of the family Buccinidae, of coastal waters and intertidal regions, having a strong snail-like shell

whelk

2
a raised lesion on the skin; wheal
References in periodicals archive ?
With modest amounts of published information available on Busycotypus caniculatus, research was initiated in 2009 across various resource areas in the Mid-Atlantic related to channeled whelk aging, reproduction, growth through maturity, age at maturity, and population structure.
Here, we performed a field investigation to establish the relative roles of dissolved and contact cues in predation by whelks (Acanthinucella spirata) on barnacles (Balanus glandula), their preferred prey.
Channeled whelk may have a similar reproductive cycle to that of knobbed whelk.
According to Lee, interviewed by Norway's NRK radio news, the plan is to develop the proposed new company into the world's largest exporter of edible whelk.
Our results suggest that the direct and indirect bottom-up influence of mussels was far stronger than predation, and thus that whelk increases in the absence of seastars were primarily due to reduced exploitation competition with Pisaster.
The veined rapa whelk [Rapana venosa (Valenciennes, 1846)] invasion into the Chesapeake Bay via ballast water introduction, from discovery in 1998 through 2009 (Harding & Mann 1999), is described herein.
Whelks to whales; coastal marine life of the Pacific Northwest, 2d ed.
Look, when it was ruled that our circus performers should wear hard hats like everywhere else; that our whelks should be kept at the same temperature as everywhere else; that our children's swings should reach the same height as everywhere else, we did moan for a bit.
The new rules could even have put the kibosh on my triumphant double-bubble in last week's Mail about how whelks both cause and prevent cancer.
The Port of London area has been subject to a similar ban on oysters, mussels and clams, but not winkles, whelks, crabs, lobster, prawn and shrimps, for the last week.