whiff


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Related to whiff: whiff test, WIFF

whiff

1
a single inhalation or exhalation from the mouth or nose

whiff

2
Chiefly Brit a narrow clinker-built skiff having outriggers, for one oarsman
References in classic literature ?
When I had inhaled this air freely, I sought the conduit pipe, which conveyed to us the beneficial whiff, and I was not long in finding it.
Torn out of its bolt-ropes, it faded like a whiff of smoke in the smoky drift of clouds shattered and torn by the shift of wind.
It is at this hour, when the breeze brings the first salt whiff of the powder to noses rather cold at the tip, and the eye can quietly take in the appearance of each red casualty, that the strain on the nerves is strongest.
The islanders, who only smoke a whiff or two at a time, and at long intervals, and who keep their pipes going from hand to hand continually, regarded my systematic smoking of four or five pipefuls of tobacco in succession, as something quite wonderful.
When he had succeeded in raising a smoke, the Major gave a long whiff, and, turning his head toward the bar, he said:
The pipe was passed from mouth to mouth, each one taking a whiff, which is equivalent to the inviolable pledge of faith, of taking salt together among the ancient Britons.
A whiff of musk, a puff of sandal-wood, and a breath of sickly jessamine-oil caught his opened nostrils.
Forthwith, however, as soon as the order was given, there was an intense red glow out of the bowl of the pipe, and a whiff of smoke came from Mother Rigby's lips.
The faintest possible whiff of a familiar perfume made my head swim with its suggestion.
As for the rest of the politicians, he cared not a whiff of his cigar's smoke for them, especially since Waterloo.
Why, Tess," he answered, after another whiff or two, "it isn't a brave bouncing girl like you who asks that?
Sitting alone at night in his library, after the household had gone to bed, he had evoked the radiant outbreak of spring down the avenues of horse-chestnuts, the flowers and statues in the public gardens, the whiff of lilacs from the flower-carts, the majestic roll of the river under the great bridges, and the life of art and study and pleasure that filled each mighty artery to bursting.