whisker

(redirected from whiskered)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms.

whisker

1. any of the stiff sensory hairs growing on the face of a cat, rat, or other mammal
2. any light spar used for extending the clews of a sail, esp in light airs
3. Chem a very fine filamentary crystal having greater strength than the bulk material since it is a single crystal. Such crystals often show unusual electrical properties

whisker

[′wis·kər]
(crystallography)
References in classic literature ?
As he spoke the musicians, who had arranged themselves in a corner, struck up a dance melody while into the room pranced the Whiskered Friskers.
Yes, the Whiskered Friskers are really very clever," he replied.
The venerable face was bearded, or rather whiskered, in the old, heavy Colonel Newcome fashion.
They looked such hard-bitten, wiry, whiskered fellows that their young adversaries felt rather desponding as to the result of the morrow's match.
For her woman's eyes, which Love had made sharp-sighted, had in one instant discovered a secret which was invisible to Miss Crawley, to poor virgin Briggs, and above all, to the stupid peepers of that young whiskered prig, Lieutenant Osborne.
The wind swayed the lights so that his sunburnt face, whiskered to the eyes, seemed to successively flicker crimson at me and to go out.
Shouldn't I be a nice sort of a Christian, if I crept into a corner of my own chimney and looked on while a parcel of whiskered savages bore off Dolly--or you?
Jerry, the manager of these dancing dogs, was a tall black- whiskered man in a velveteen coat, who seemed well known to the landlord and his guests and accosted them with great cordiality.
He felt all at once that it would be loathsome to pass that seat on which after the girl was gone, he had sat and pondered, and that it would be hateful, too, to meet that whiskered policeman to whom he had given the twenty copecks: "Damn him
A whiskered man on the corner of Flagler had been screaming and kicking his own bicycle for five minutes.
The counterpart to Julie's predicament is the amusing bourgeois respectability of her friend Carrie and her pompous but successful husband Enoch Snow (a sparky Zoe Clarkson and a muttonchop whiskered Richard Armstrong); while common sense and communal compassion are provided by Nettie Fowler (Becky Sutcliffe, who sings very strongly).