whistle-blowing


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whistle-blowing,

exposure of fraud and abuse by an employee. The federal law that legitimated the concept of the whistle-blower, the False Claims Act (1863, revised 1986), was created to combat fraud by suppliers to the federal government during the Civil War. Under the act, whistle-blowers can receive a percentage of the money recovered or damages won by the government in fraud cases they expose. The act also protects whistle-blowers from wrongful dismissal, allowing for reinstatement with seniority, double back pay, interest on back pay, compensation for discriminatory treatment, and reasonable legal fees. Federal legislation in 1978 barred reprisals against those who exposed government corruption. Harassment and dismissal of and the revelation of widespread waste and fraud in defense contracting led Congress to strengthen the position of whistle-blowers in 1989. Many states also have employment laws that deal with discriminatory treatment of whistle-blowers.
References in periodicals archive ?
The GCG whistle-blowing system provides persons with information easy access to GCG communication lines, as well as various reporting channels such as the GCG website, confidential meetings with authorized GCG officers, e-mail, mail, short messaging system, telephone and fax.
Still, as valuable as it is, an important debate lies on whistle-blowing.
Abdulqader Obaid Ali, President of UAE IAA talked about the challenges and opportunities faced by Internal Auditors when dealing with whistle-blowing complaints.
To ensure whistle-blowing genuinely works, people need to feel they are free to whistle-blow in good faith without fear of victimisation.
There was no correlation between their dismissal and their whistle-blowing on alleged un-reporting of injuries to prisoners.
A new section will be added to the NHS terms and conditions handbook outlining the whistle-blowing rights for staff.
When she raised the issues with the charity's boss, Gareth Binding, she said she was constantly brushed off then subjected to a campaign of victimisation for whistle-blowing.
Laws protecting whistle-blowing nurses exist in only some US states.
Articles about whistle-blowing continue to appear on a regular basis in the popular press as well as in managerial publications and the academic literature (e.
An excellent example of whistle-blowing in a healthcare organization is the case of Barry Adams, RN, who blew the whistle on unsafe nurse staffing and its impact on patient care.