Cronartium ribicola

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Related to white pine blister rust: whitebark pine, Cronartium ribicola

Cronartium ribicola

[krə¦närd·ē·əm ‚rib·i′kō·lə]
(mycology)
A heteroecious rust fungus that causes white pine blister rust; it produces pycnia and aecia on pine stems, and uredinia and telia on currants and gooseberries.
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Treatments to limit white pine blister rust have included the physical removal of understory species in the genus Ribes, which is an alternate host for the pathogen (Maloy 1997); chemical spraying of Ribes species; and breeding of resistant sugar pine (Samman and Kitzmiller 1996).
Several currant cultivars on trial at Corvallis show no signs of white pine blister rust under natural conditions," says Hummer.
Working at American Forests, there is something I can do to help these forests survive the twin threats they're facing--an invasive disease, white pine blister rust, and a scourge of insects, mountain pine beetle.
The Clark's nutcracker is the primary seed disperser of the pine, but as whitebark pine populations decline due to other factors, such as mountain pine beetle and white pine blister rust, the Clark's nutcracker might move on to other pine trees as a food source, causing whitebark pine numbers to diminish further.
Today, however, sugar pines account for less than five percent of the area's forest composition due to white pine blister rust.
The GYA pilot project addresses a combination of threats -- white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetles and climate change -- that are jeopardizing the health of western high-elevation forests.
Fish and Wildlife Service determination that listing the whitebark pine is "warranted," as this high-lights the, imminets risks Facing the species duo to climate change, wildfire suppression policy, mountain pine beetles, white pine blister rust, and other factors.
As of this year, estimates indicate that as much as 77 percent of the whitebark pine community stretching from Canada to the California Sierras may be succumbing to white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle infestation, or some combination of the two.
White pine blister rust is killing off whitebark pines throughout the Intermountain West; the majestic trees are further threatened by mountain pine beetles.