White Pine

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white pine

A soft, light wood that works easily; does not split when nailed; does not swell or warp appreciably; is widely used in building construction. See also: Masonite

White Pine

 

(Pinus strobus), a tree of the pine family. Its trunk is straight and tall. In its native habitat in North America, it reaches a height of 60 m and a diameter of 150 cm. Young branches are bare, with soft gray-green needles (5-10 cm long) gathered in clumps of five each, which stay on the branches for two or three years. The cones are narrow and cylindrical (8-16 cm long) and are in groups of one to three on long stems. They ripen in the summer of the second year after flowering and open in the fall. The white pine begins to bear fruit after the 25th year, occasionally earlier. It prefers fresh sandy and loamy soils, in which it grows rapidly, outgrowing common pines, firs, and Siberian larch. It grows more poorly than these species in dry and poor soils. White pine is comparatively shade tolerant and wind resistant and is not affected by snow accumulation. It can survive frosts of -30° to -40° C. It is often infested with blebby rust.

White pine has been bred in Europe since the 17th century. It is cultivated as a forest and decorative type in the western and central regions of the European part of the USSR. The tree’s wood is soft and light. It is used in construction for interior parts of buildings; in the furniture, pencil, and match industries; and for plywood and cellulose.

A. P. SHIMANIUK

white pine

A soft, light wood; works easily; does not split when nailed; does not swell or warp appreciably; widely used in building construction.
References in periodicals archive ?
A mutated fungus is infecting white pine forests in parts of New Hampshire, according to a U.
After the show, I walked to the lakefront, where children were still squealing atop the Ferris wheel, then drove to my art-filled room at the Meadowgrove B&B, set in a grove of white pines outside town.
In the central Appalachian region, where white pine (Pinus strobus) is the primary commercial tree species planted in minesoils, the PRP foresters believe the goal of reclamation should be to create land with an SI of 100 feet.
For this reason eastern white pines also became known as King's Arrow pines.
The original black currant farming ban occurred when the United States began importing European white pine seedlings, and white pine blister rust disease came with them.
Before the lumberjacks cut the old-growth as efficiently as a sheep is shorn of its wool, white pines up to 240 feet tall were not uncommon.
Unaware of the cause, the United States began re-importing European white pine seedlings, since U.
A few years ago she started similar work on white pines.
amp;uot;We're very pleased that Citigroup Investments, Davis, Tuttle Venture Partners, Diamond State Ventures, Kansas Venture Capital, MorAmerica Venture Group, and White Pines, along with our previous investors Kansas City Equity Partners and Gateway Associates, have recognized Digital Archaeology's tremendous potential and invested in our continued growth and success,&uot; said David Frankland, President and CEO of Digital Archaeology.
Here, a tall row of sturdy, wind-swept white pines clings to the last bit of high land.