wax

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wax,

substance secreted by glands on the abdomen of the bee and known commonly as beeswax; also various substances resembling beeswax. Waxes are mixtures comprising chiefly esters of monohydroxy alcohols, besides other esters and free fatty acids, free alcohols, and higher hydrocarbons. They differ from fats in that fats contain chiefly esters of glycerol. Waxes are generally harder and less greasy than fats, but like fats they are less dense than water and are soluble in alcohol and ether but not in water. Among the waxes derived from plants are carnauba wax, obtained from the leaves of a palmpalm,
common name for members of the Palmae, a large family of chiefly tropical trees, shrubs, and vines. Most species are treelike, characterized by a crown of compound leaves, called fronds, terminating a tall, woody, unbranched stem.
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 grown in Brazil, and candelilla wax, produced by a Mexican plant (Euphorbia antisyphilitica). Those of animal origin include wool wax, or lanolin, obtained from the surface of wool fibers and used in making certain creams, ointments, and soaps, in the processes of finishing and softening leather, and as an ingredient of some paints and varnishes; spermacetispermaceti
, solid waxy substance, white, odorless, and tasteless, separated from the oils obtained from the sperm whale (see sperm oil) and other marine mammals. A mixture of esters of fatty acids, it is composed chiefly of cetyl palmitate.
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, obtained from the sperm whale, and Chinese wax, which is deposited on certain trees in parts of Asia (especially China and India) by a species of scale insect. Mineral waxes include ozocerite and paraffinparaffin,
white, more-or-less translucent, odorless, tasteless, waxy solid. It melts between 47°C; and 65°C; and is insoluble in water but soluble in ether, benzene, and certain esters. Paraffin is unaffected by most common chemical reagents but burns readily in air.
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, both composed of hydrocarbons. Japan wax and bayberry (or myrtle) wax are composed chiefly of fats.

Bibliography

See L. Roth and J. Weiner, Waxes, Waxing and Wax Modifiers (1961); H. Bennett, Industrial Waxes (2 vol., 1963); P. E. Kolattukudy, ed., Chemistry and Biochemistry of Natural Waxes (1976).

wax

[waks]
(materials)
Any of a group of substances resembling beeswax in appearance and character, and in general distinguished by their composition of esters and higher alcohols, and by their freedom from fatty acids.

wax

A thermoplastic solid material obtained from vegetable, mineral, and animal matter; soluble in organic solvents; used in paste or liquid form as a protective coating or polish on wood and metal surfaces and as an additive in paints.

wax

1. any of various viscous or solid materials of natural origin: characteristically lustrous, insoluble in water, and having a low softening temperature, they consist largely of esters of fatty acids
2. any of various similar substances, such as paraffin wax or ozocerite, that have a mineral origin and consist largely of hydrocarbons
3. short for beeswax, sealing wax
4. Physiol another name for cerumen
5. a resinous preparation used by shoemakers to rub on thread
6. bone wax a mixture of wax, oil, and carbolic acid applied to the cut surface of a bone to prevent bleeding
References in periodicals archive ?
extensa are: the leaves and primary bracts densely covered by a dense layer of white wax, lateral branches shorter (30-45 cm vs.
One of the two sculptures on view, Untitled/black #856S-96/97, 1997, was saturated with black rather than white wax, perhaps more pointedly suggesting Hiroshima's toxic rain.
2 sterile exceeding the internodes, ecarinate; floral bracts suborbicular, 40-46 x 37-40 mm, pale greenish-yellow toward the apex and the apical margins, pale castaneus-yellowish toward the base and centrally, inconspicuously and sparsely white-lepidote inside, glabrous outside but covered by white epicuticular white wax, almost completely enfolding the sepals and equaling 2/3 to 3/5 of its length, cymbiform and distinctly convex, irregularly longitudinally sulcate at anthesis, ecarinate or the basal ones sometimes obtusely carinate, apex obtuse to subacute, the upper ones densely imbricate in before and at early anthesis.
The center of the bouquet held white miniature calla lilies encircled with dark pink Sweet Unique roses, pale pink Anna roses, and cream Virginia roses collared in white wax flowers and arranged in a silver tussie-mussie.
They carried bouquets of cream Virginia roses and pale pink Anna roses with white wax flowers hand tied with champagne French sheer ribbon.
The bride's bouquet was a nosegay of white hydrangeas with Virginia roses, white lisianthus, white Freesias, and white wax flowers, tied with a satin ribbon along with two embroidered handkerchiefs from both of her grandmothers.
Each wore a strapless, chocolate satin gown with a contrasting ivory band at the natural waist and carried a single stem coral rose with white wax flowers and bear grass, tied with cream ribbon.
Each mother carried a nosegay of Eskimo roses and bridal white wax flowers in a silver Victorian tussie-mussie.
She carried an English garden bouquet of black-eyed Susans, hypericum, white wax flower, and rosemary.
They carried English nosegays of pink roses, petite green hydrangeas, white wax flower, white stock, and blush pink spray roses.
She carried a hand-tied bouquet of Forever Young red roses laced with white wax flower and wispy filler.