white-collar worker

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white-collar worker

a nonmanual employee. The term is mainly applied to those who occupy relatively routine posts in the lower sectors of nonmanual employment. A focus on differences in dress between nonmanual and manual workers reflects historical underlying differences in STATUS and WORK SITUATION, as well as MARKET SITUATION, between the two types of workers. See also MANUAL AND NONMANUAL LABOUR, MIDDLE CLASSES.
References in periodicals archive ?
Teakell delivers proven representation for companies and individuals in a variety of white-collar and other criminal defense matters, including grand jury proceedings and internal investigations involving allegations of fraud, bribery, embezzlement, insider trading, stock option backdating, tax evasion, and public corruption.
White-collar boxing began at Gleason's Gym, New York, in the 1980s when gym owner Bruce Silverglade began organising informal fights between professional workers.
Qataris (68%) and white-collar respondents (52%), however, agree more strongly that their neighbours are willing to help compared to blue-collar respondents (21%).
It's a really serious challenge to represent someone charged with white-collar crimes," Banks, 64, said.
Prof Levi, the latest in a long line of distinguished scholars to hold the post, said: "I may be the last elderly white male to occupy this post, judging from the excellent alternatives this time, and I am delighted that a number of younger scholars are coming through to form the next generation of white-collar criminologists.
The functions of the current ICC are outdated for the white-collar criminals of our age.
For the blue-collar workers the money they win is distributed evenly among themselves at the end of the game - but with the white-collar group the winner takes all.
He teaches criminological theory, white-collar crime, and life-course theory.
What is most astounding about this provision, as Linder makes clear, is that there is no indication in any of the Congressional debates or committee reports on the FLSA that offers any clue what Congress intended in enacting this so-called white-collar exemption (even though Congress directed DOL to issue regulations defining the scope of the exemption).
Limited unionism among these new white-collar workers deserves close exploration.
attorney, Bornstein served as a trial lawyer specializing in white-collar criminal cases.
Given that blue-collar workers are less likely to practice healthy lifestyle behaviours than white-collar workers (Morris, Conrad, Marcantonio, Marks, & Ribisl, 1999), there is a need for health policymakers and health-promotion practitioners to address the circumstances of male blue-collar workers.