white-eye


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white-eye,

common name for warblerlike, arboreal birds, including 85 species in the family Zosteropidae, and for certain species of ducks. The members of Zosteropidae, with the exception of a few species, are marked by a ring of tiny, white feathers surrounding the eye and are also known as silvereyes and spectacle birds. They are predominantly olive to yellow-green above, with whitish or grayish abdomens. With the exception of a few species of the genus Zosterops, such as Z. erythropleura of NE China, white-eyes are tropical, dwelling in wooded habitats from sea level to timberline and ranging from sub-Saharan Africa to Asia and Australia. They are typically small, except for several giant species such as two in the South Pacific genus Woodfordia, which also lack the white eye ring. Aided by their short, pointed, slightly decurved bills and brushlike tongues, white-eyes feed on a varied diet consisting of insects, fruits, berries, and nectar. They are much disliked by farmers because of their habit of piercing fruit with their bills. White-eyes are highly gregarious birds, given to constantly calling in a soft, warbling song. They build their deep, cup-shaped nests in tree forks, in which the female deposits two or three white or pale blue eggs. Incubation periods may be as short as 10 1-2 days, among the shortest known of any bird. The common name white-eye is also given to certain of the unrelated pochards (ducklike birds) of the family Anatidae and especially to the white-eyed pochard (Nyroca ferina). These are probably called white-eyes for their tiny irises set in a large white sclera. Although these white-eyes are worldwide in distribution, they are found primarily in the Northern Hemisphere. N. ferina is found throughout Great Britain and Europe. In its breeding plumage, it has a chestnut-red head with a light gray body bordered in black on the breast and tail. With their webbed feet set far back on their bodies, pochards are poor walkers, but they are among the best of the diving birds. They feed on a variety of aquatic animals, using their muscular tongues as pistons to pump water through their bills. The water is strained through bony plates lining the inner edges of the bill. Their young are especially well developed at birth and rapidly take to water. White-eyes are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Passeriformes, family Zosteropidae; or order Anseriformes, family Anatidae.
References in periodicals archive ?
In April 2006, the DFW and its partners embarked on an expedition to Sarigan with a field crew of 22 to assess the recovery of Sarigan's ecosystem and to determine if its habitat was suitable for the white-eye.
We are looking forward to translocating white-eyes to Sarigan in 2007 with our partners from the American Zoo and Aquarium Association.
Population estimates for the Rota bridled white-eye have declined dramatically since the early 1980s, when it numbered almost 11,000 birds.
The exact causes for the sharp decline in Rota bridled white-eye populations are unknown.
All eight white-eye nests were in Merrilliodendron megacarpum trees.
White-eyes on the Togian Islands (but not those of Bangkurung) are similar in most characters to the Black-crowned White-eye (Z.
Initially, we mistook two nests for Bridled White-eye (Zosterops conspicillatus saypani) nests due to their similar size, structure, and placement.
Birds such as white-eyes are already famous for diversifying quickly, but Jetz and his colleagues also found fast diversification among ducks, woodpeckers and some groups of gulls.
Around 15% munched on by the white-eyes bird were alive in droppings.
In May 2006, we began to develop trapping and holding procedures with a group of zoological experts by capturing 40 white-eyes for captive breeding.
The birds are vastly different in size, from 10-gram Japanese white-eyes to 7,000-gram sarus cranes.
These have been dismantled by competition with introduced Japanese White-eyes (Zosterops japonicus), documented in Evolutionary Ecology Research 10:931-965 (2008) (= EER 2008), referenced and dismissed in the book.