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White Book

(language, publication)

White Book

(language, publication, file format)
The fourth book in Adobe Systems, Inc.'s PostScript series, describing the previously-secret format of Type 1 fonts. The other three official guides are known as the Blue Book, the Green Book, and the Red Book.

["Adobe Type 1 Font Format, version 1.1", Addison-Wesley, 1990 (ISBN 0-201-57044-0)].

White Book

(hardware, standard)

white book

(1) A laptop computer made from commonly available parts. See white box.

(2) (White Book) The documentation for the technical specification of Video CDs. See Video CD.
References in periodicals archive ?
Joel Whitebook, 'Michel Foucault: A Marcusean in Structuralist Clothing', Thesis Eleven, 71, 1 (2002): 52-70.
Joel Whitebook, ' Mutual Recognition and the Work of the Negative', in Pluralism and the Pragmatic Turn: The Transformation of Critical Theory, essays in Honour of Thomas McCarthy, eds.
In fact, the average early childhood program in the United States is likely to range from poor to mediocre in quality (Blau & Mocan, 2002; Cost, Quality and Child Outcomes Study Team, 1995; National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Early Child Care Research Network, 2000a; Whitebook, Howes, & Phillips, 1990).
Marcy Whitebook, a leader of the childcare workers living-wage movement for 30 years, says that the workforce started to change in the 1970s, when white, college-educated women got the chance to escape traditional women's work.
The Cluster Policies Whitebook, International Organisation for Knowledge Economy and Enterprise Development, Malmo.
Among the primary factors associated with quality early education are the compensation, education, and retention of teachers (Helburn 1995; Howes, Smith, and Galinsky 1995; Whitebook, Howes, and Phillips 1998; Phillips, Mekos, Scarr, McCartney, and AbbottShim 2001).
Whitebook, Howes, Darrah, and Friedman's (1982) findings indicated that if these findings are robust, then internally locus of controlled individuals should experience less stress than externally locus of controlled individuals.
This is because internals feel they have input into their work environment, perceive less emotional exhaustion, and receive higher job satisfaction (Fuqua and Couture, 1986; Whitebook et al.
According to data collected by Marcy Whitebook of the Center for the Child Care Workforce, some 22 percent to 34 percent of teachers in regulated child care centers and family child care settings do not have a high school diploma; Ellen Galinsky, president of the Families and Work Institute, reports that in unregulated family-and-relative child care settings, between 33 percent and 46 percent of caregivers have not completed high school.
What moved the childcare crisis into the public spotlight, says Marcy Whitebook of the University of California, Berkeley, and founding director of the center, was a study that linked preschool teachers' pay directly to quality of care.
Historical research clearly documents that Fromm was an important and early member of the Frankfurt School but the origin myth constructed by contemporary partisans of critical theory has replaced Fromm by Herbert Marcuse and Theodor Adorno and, most incredibly, Walter Benjamin (Alexander, 1987; Agger, 1992; Alford, 1988; Buck-Morss, 1977; Therborn, 1970; Whitebook, 1995).
Public education couldn't do it without tax money," notes Mary Whitebook of the Center for the Child Care Workforce.