whooping crane


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

whooping crane:

see cranecrane,
large wading bird found in marshes in the Northern Hemisphere and in Africa. Although sometimes confused with herons, cranes are more closely related to rails and limpkins.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

whooping crane

[′hu̇p·iŋ ‚krān]
(vertebrate zoology)
Grus americana. A member of a rare North American migratory species of wading birds; the entire species forms a single population.
References in periodicals archive ?
Operation Migration's long-standing dedication and unique approach to whooping crane recovery continues to inspire followers across the globe," said Southern Company Chief Environmental Officer Dr.
Materials needed for Whooping Crane Pen as follows:
7) 9 The wild whooping crane population is still at risk from habitat loss, pollution, collision with power lines, predation, low genetic diversity, parasites, and disease.
1) The Crane Trust, 6611 Whooping Crane Drive, Wood River, NE, 68883, USA.
Caption: Sara, the federally endangered whooping crane (Grus Americana).
Report, Nature Conservancy and the Platte River Whooping Crane Critical Habitat Maintenance Trust, Alda, NE.
Through the extraordinary efforts of the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership--a coalition of public and private organizations and individuals --a migrating population of whooping cranes now takes to the skies each year over the eastern United States, allowing people who may never have had the opportunity otherwise to glimpse this rare beauty.
A FLOCK of rare whooping cranes on its inaugural winter migration to Florida are grounded in Alabama while a US government agency decides whether a plane guiding them will be allowed to proceed.
Students are asked to observe a whooping crane scene and to record observable data in the table provided.
A Summer Red Bird swallows a fat black beetle; Purple Grackles munch a half-eaten corncob; a Whooping Crane flips over a baby alligator for lunch.
Described by early explorers as "a mile wide and a foot deep,' Nebraska's Platte River provided a cornucopia of habitats for species nov, endangered, like the whooping crane (Grus americana), least tern (Sterna antillarum), piping plover (Charadrius melodus), and pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus).