widow of Ephesus

widow of Ephesus

weeping over her husband’s corpse, she is cheered by a compassionate sentry and they become ardent lovers in the burial vault. [Rom. Lit.: Satyricon]
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Their topics include sententiousness in Roman comedy: a moralizing reading, Plautus undoing himself: what is funny and what is Plautine in Stichus and Trinummus, basket case: material girl and animate object in Plautus' Cistellaria, when reason surrenders its authority: Thyestes' approach to Atreus' palace, Petronian spectacles: the Widow of Ephesus generically revisited, and Seneca's Thyestes: three female translators into English.
The Widow of Ephesus," the scandalous classical story behind Chapman's play, is the perfect paradigm of this fixation with a widow's performance of grief.
With its extensive borrowing from Petronius's version of the legend of the widow of Ephesus, as well as its echoes of Homer's Penelope and Ulysses, Shakespeare's Twelfth Night and Hamlet (and possibly Othello), (29) its fascination with suspicion and constancy also looks toward the tragicomedies of Beaumont and Fletcher.
Like the widow of Ephesus, his wife/widow Cynthia proves vulnerable to seduction despite her vows.
McGlathery's essay, "The Tomb of Epic: Bakhtinian Parody and Petronius' Tale of the Widow of Ephesus," demonstrates how Bakhtin's notion of the "ancient complex" of folk culture -- those aspects of human experience such as food, sex, and death and the physical site of the public square -- can be applied to Petronius' tale of the Widow of Ephesus, and how such an application enhances the tale's "carnivalesque leveling of the 'high' and 'low' categories of human existence" (120).
Chapter 4, "Sex, Food, and Money: Low Themes versus High Scenarios," first examines Petrionius's famed Milesian tale, the story of the widow of Ephesus.