wig


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wig,

arrangement of artificial or human hair worn to conceal baldness, as a disguise, or as part of a costume, either theatrical, ceremonial, or fashionable. In ancient Egypt the wig was worn to protect the head from the sun; short-haired and in many tiers or long and thickly plaited, the wig was an ingenious structure and rather formalized in appearance. Roman women, who favored light hair, often wore blond wigs. The wig came into popular fashion in Europe in the 17th cent. First worn in France during the reign of Louis XIII, who himself wore a wig of long curls that was meant to simulate real hair, the fashion became widespread during the reign of Charles II of England. As human hair was both difficult to obtain and expensive, the hair of horses and goats was often used. The natural wig eventually gave way to the formal peruke or periwig. Later (c.1690) scented pomade and white powder of starch and plaster of Paris were used on the wigs; pink, gray, and blue powder were fashionable as the fad grew. At its height during the reign of Louis XV, the powdered wig was out of fashion by 1794. The periwig gradually gave way to a smaller wig with horizontal curls above the ears and with the back drawn into a loose queue and tied with a bow. By 1788 men began to wear their own hair tied at the back (and sometimes powdered) in imitation of a wig; wigs however continued their hold on the professional classes and can be seen today in the official dress of English courts. After 1800, as long hair for men lost favor, the wig became a part of women's fashions. Today the use of the wig is dictated by fashion.

Wig

 

a covering of hair for the head, made of human hair, animal hair, or synthetic material sewn onto a cloth foundation. Wigs were widely worn in ancient Egypt, Assyria, Babylonia, and other countries. They were very popular in ancient Greece and Rome from the first century A.D., mainly among women. Wigs were introduced in Europe at the end of the 16th century. They became obligatory for the nobility and the state employees in the 18th century but at the end of the century went out of style. Wigs have continued to be traditional for judges in a number of foreign countries into the 20th century. In the late 1960’s, wigs again became fashionable for everyday wear. Wigs are used in the theater and in films to alter an actor’s appearance and achieve certain make-up effects. Trick wigs, with concealed mechanisms, are sometimes used in the circus.

What does it mean when you dream about a wig?

A dream about wearing a wig could represent everything from disguising oneself under a new identity to adopting false or unnatural ideas. It has also been said that wearing a wig in a dream could reflect anxiety about losing one’s hair.

References in classic literature ?
It rustled the silken garments of the ladies, and waved the long curls of the gentlemen's wigs, and shook the window-hangings and the curtains of the bedchambers; causing everywhere a singular stir, which yet was more like a hush.
It impressed me as if the ancient Surveyor, in his garb of a hundred years gone by, and wearing his immortal wig -- which was buried with him, but did not perish in the grave -- had bet me in the deserted chamber of the Custom-House.
The tittering rose higher and higher -- the cat was within six inches of the absorbed teacher's head -- down, down, a little lower, and she grabbed his wig with her desperate claws, clung to it, and was snatched up into the garret in an instant with her trophy still in her possession
The gentleman from Tellson's had nothing left for it but to empty his glass with an air of stolid desperation, settle his odd little flaxen wig at the ears, and follow the waiter to Miss Manette's apartment.
Sharp's wig didn't fit him; and that he needn't be so 'bounceable' - somebody else said
That's the judge,' she said to herself, `because of his great wig.
if it's not a wig, I never saw longer or fairer all the days of my life.
He proceeded to take down a wig which was hanging on a nail, and put it hurriedly on his head.
Now and then, perhaps, an officer of the crown passed along the street, wearing the gold-laced hat, white wig, and embroidered waistcoat which were the fashion of the day.
For this, properly speaking wonderful, reason I was the only one of the company who could listen without constraint to the unbidden guest with that fine head of white hair, so beautifully kept, so magnificently waved, so artistically arranged that respect could not be felt for it any more than for a very expensive wig in the window of a hair-dresser.
Then he added, with some irrelevance, "That's why he wears a wig.
There is the registrar below the judge, in wig and gown; and there are two or three maces, or petty- bags, or privy purses, or whatever they may be, in legal court suits.