wild


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

wild

1. (of animals) living independently of man; not domesticated or tame
2. (of plants) growing in a natural state; not cultivated
3. living in a savage or uncivilized way
4. (of a card, such as a joker or deuce in some games) able to be given any value the holder pleases
5. a desolate, uncultivated, or uninhabited region
References in classic literature ?
His bare foot caught Jerry on the sensitive end of his recently bobbed tail, and Jerry, outraged, with the sense of sacrilege committed upon him, went instantly wild.
There would be great difficulty in proving its truth: we may safely conclude that very many of the most strongly-marked domestic varieties could not possibly live in a wild state.
On occasion he accompanied Dede and Daylight on deer hunts through the wild canons and over the rugged steeps of Hood Mountain, though more often Dede and Daylight were out alone.
When, after weeks and weeks of cautious driving of scattered elephants across the hills, the forty or fifty wild monsters were driven into the last stockade, and the big drop gate, made of tree trunks lashed together, jarred down behind them, Kala Nag, at the word of command, would go into that flaring, trumpeting pandemonium (generally at night, when the flicker of the torches made it difficult to judge distances), and, picking out the biggest and wildest tusker of the mob, would hammer him and hustle him into quiet while the men on the backs of the other elephants roped and tied the smaller ones.
Most of them had already experienced the wild freedom of savage life, and looked forward to a renewal of past scenes of adventure and exploit.
For the last time the wild cherry-tree bloomed,--wonderful blossom, glittering with tears, and gloriously radiant with stormy lights of wild passion and wilder hopes.
I was about to speak further, when I observed the wild oats near the place of the disturbance moving in the most inexplicable way.
It was the Wild still clinging to him, asserting itself through him.
Not a flock of wild geese cackles over our town, but it to some extent unsettles the value of real estate here, and, if I were a broker, I should probably take that disturbance into account.
But his appearance was no more unusual than the manner of his coming, there to my mother and me as we perched above the angry wild pigs.
Tublat was his most consistent enemy, but it was through Tublat that, when he was about thirteen, the persecution of his enemies suddenly ceased and he was left severely alone, except on the occasions when one of them ran amuck in the throes of one of those strange, wild fits of insane rage which attacks the males of many of the fiercer animals of the jungle.
Every morning she went with the child to the garden where the wild beasts were kept, and washed herself there in a clear stream.