wild parsnip


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Related to wild parsnip: cow parsnip
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giant hogweed

giant hogweed

Grows up to 17 feet high. Do not touch! Blisters skin, long-lasting scars, and—if it comes in contact with eyes—blindness. Numerous white flowers clustered in an umbrella-shaped head that is up to 80 centimetres (31 in) in diameter across its flat top. Dark reddish-purple stem and spotted leaf stalks that are hollow and produce sturdy bristles. Giant Hogweed is a photo-toxic plant. Its sap can cause phytophotodermatitis (severe skin inflammations) when the skin is exposed to sunlight or to UV-rays. Initially the skin turns red and starts itching. Then blisters form as it burns within 48 hours. They form black or purplish scars that can last several years. Protective clothing, including eye protection, should be worn when handling or digging it. If skin is exposed, the affected area should be washed thoroughly with soap and water and the exposed skin protected from the sun for several days. Also called Giant Cow Parsley, but not the same as common, much smaller cow parsley, which is edible.

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edible angelica

edible angelica

Grows up to 6ft (2m). Depending on the variety, flowers range from pale lavender-blue to deep rose and have a licorice-celery-like flavor. Use seeds, stems, young leaves and shoots. Leaves used in salads or tea. Stems can be eaten raw. Has stimulating effects on digestive system. Helps relieve indigestion, gas, colic, heartburn. Helps cough up phlegm and relieve bronchitis. Used for colds, respiratory system, liver, strengthening heart, increasing circulation and energy, antibacterial, anti-fungal, hepatitis, . Dried root powder used for athlete’s foot, insecticide. Take in moderation because it might cause dermatitis. It thins blood, so don’t take it if you are on anticoagulants. Promotes menstruation. Do not take if pregnant or diabetic. WARNING- DO NOT CONFUSE WITH POISON HEMLOCK AND GIANT HOGWEED! They look similar. Look at the leaves.
References in periodicals archive ?
But I've gotten poor results freezing wild parsnips and evening primrose roots--tough and stringy would be the best descriptors.
But the article on page 66 of the May/June issue about eating wild parsnips made me feel I had to write to you.
Many rural folks, who know the wild parsnip only as a tenacious weed that cows don't eat and humans avoid, are shocked to hear that the plant is edible, while I am shocked that more people do not take advantage of this free produce.
Aconite, Allspice, Black Snakeroot, Bloodroot, Blue Cohosh, Boxwood, Celandine, Common Poppy, Crotalaria, Crow Poison, Death Camas, Dicentra, False Hellebore, False Jessamine, Fume wort, Hellebore, Hemp, Horse Nettle, Indian Hemp, Indian poke, Jimson weed, Larkspur, Lobelia, Lupines, Marijuana, Monkshood, Moonseed, Night shade, Pink Death, Camas Poison, Darnel, Poison Hemlock, Poison rye grass, Rattleweed, Rock Poppy, Spider Lily, Spotted cowbane, Spotted Water Hemlock, Stagger grass, Staggerweed, Sweet Shrub, Thorn Apple, Varebells, Wild Parsnip, Wolfs-bane, Yellow Jessamine.