wild thyme


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wild thyme

wild thyme

Small purple, pink/ white flowers clustered on ends of sticks with tiny leaves. Very good antiseptic for both internal and external use in combatting bacteria, virus, infections and fungus in the digestive, respiratory and genitourinary tracts (eg- candida, yeast, fungus, etc) and skin conditions like athlete’s foot, ringworm, rash, acne, cuts, injuries, sores, burns, crabs, lice, wrinkles, and any injuries on body. Great balm for face. Has soothing properties if inhaled or drank as tea for calming bronchials, asthma, coughing, chest infections, hay fever. Thyme is an expectorant that helps remove fluid and phlegm. Helps alleviate problems of the digestive tract like spastic colon, IBSirritable bowel syndrome. The combined antiseptic and astringent properties of thyme are used for diarrhea while restoring healthy bacteria levels, particularly in handling candida. Helps decontaminate the liver, gallbladder and invigorates the whole digestive system. Also used for indigestion, blood circulation, immune system, expelling worms, depression, fatigue, anxiety, sleeplessness, urinary tract infections, gout, and removing contagions of the reproductive organs. Another plant called “Mother of Thyme” (Thymus serpyllum), a low ground-cover used around stepping stones is also edible.
References in periodicals archive ?
15 In February 1941, O'Sullevan himself was due to ride Wild Thyme in a Plumpton novice chase, but went down with pneumonia the day before the race and was never to ride competitively.
The Szamatulskis experimented with a Midas brew, combining barley malt, wild thyme honey from Greece and partially fermented Muscat grape juice.
The pair won the pony team test at the Addington Premier League Show in Buckinghamshire at the end of February and Henry is also currently riding the pony mare Wild Thyme, who finished fifth in the Dengie Elementary Freestyle Championship at Solihull.
Thyme, especially English wild thyme, can be used to relieve convulsive coughs when infused as a tea and sweetened with honey.
A five-minute drive inland from the busy north coast and you are in a different world - mile after mile of beautiful olive groves, the chirping of cicadas, the distinctive aroma of wild thyme, oregano and other herbs and not another vehicle in sight.
And the wild thyme said, - I'll have you know, I'm a tree and not just some flower, so please, hold me in the proper esteem.
In Provence in the summer the air is filled with warm aromas of wild thyme, rosemary, summer savory, fennel, oregano, and sage, all mingled with exquisite lavender, so the traditional Provencal seasoning mixture for fish always includes dried lavender.
It is also possible that as the stomata (pores) on the vine leaves open and shut as part of the process of transpiration, some of the heady aromas are absorbed by the plant and eventually find their way into the wine, as growers in New Zealand's Central Otago, whose vines are surrounded by wild thyme, have suggested.
Trace element contents and essential oil yields from wild thyme plant (Thymus serpyllum L.
There's a wild plant buffet with over a dozen dishes including wild flowers over beets, malva -- khobbeizeh in Arabic -- with olive oil and chickpeas, moghrabieh with sea plants and fish, and a simple but amazing cheese packed with fresh wild thyme (see recipe).
According to Debs Goodenough, his head gardener, the Prince also insists on pruning the trees himself, keeps a duck to eat the slugs and has wild thyme planted on the footpaths so that walkers can joke about walking through time.