wilderness


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wilderness,

land retaining its primeval character with the imprint of humans minimal or unnoticeable. In the United States, the Wilderness Act of 1964 established the National Wilderness Preservation System with a nucleus of 9 million acres (3.6 million hectares) of land in 54 different areas, mostly in Western states, and provided for the designation of new wilderness areas. By 1992, the total had risen to 95 million acres (38.4 million hectares) in 708 parcels of land. Alaska, with 57.6 million acres (23.3 million hectares), was by far the leading repository of wilderness; Ohio had but 77 acres, and some states had none, although designated areas included several Eastern locations where signs of civilization were substantially erased. Wilderness lands are to be preserved in their natural condition, wild and undeveloped, both for their own sake and for humankind's solitude and enjoyment of their beauty. The idea of wilderness has deep roots in American thought (see environmentalismenvironmentalism,
movement to protect the quality and continuity of life through conservation of natural resources, prevention of pollution, and control of land use. The philosophical foundations for environmentalism in the United States were established by Thomas Jefferson,
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). In the 17th cent. William Penn decreed that one acre of forest be left wild for every five that were cleared. Henry David Thoreau believed that the existence of wilderness was justified by the inspiration people could draw from it.

Bibliography

See P. Brooks, The Pursuit of Wilderness (1971); R. Nash, Wilderness and the American Mind (3d ed. 1982).

Wilderness

[′wil·dər·nəs]
(geology)
A North American stage of Middle Ordovician geologic time, above Porterfield and below Trentonian.

wilderness

a wild, uninhabited, and uncultivated region

Wilderness

the. the barren regions to the south and east of Palestine, esp those in which the Israelites wandered before entering the Promised Land and in which Christ fasted for 40 days and nights
References in classic literature ?
He was musing on the strange influence that had led him away from his premeditated course, and so far into the depths of the wilderness.
The heart of Dorcas was not sad; for she felt that it was better to journey in the wilderness with two whom she loved than to be a lonely woman in a crowd that cared not for her.
About this time I returned to Kentucke with my family; and here, to avoid an enquiry into my conduct, the reader being before informed of my bringing my family to Kentucke, I am under the necessity of informing him that, during my captivity with the Indians, my wife, who despaired of ever seeing me again, expecting the Indians had put a period to my life, oppressed with the distresses of the country, and bereaved of me, her only happiness, had, before I returned, transported my family and goods, on horses, through the wilderness, amidst a multitude of dangers, to her father's house, in North-Carolina.
In the mean time, the alarm spread through the neighbourhood; the armed men collected immediately, and pursued the ravagers into the wilderness.
Many dark and sleepless nights have I been a companion for owls, separated from the chearful society of men, scorched by the Summer's sun, and pinched by the Winter's cold, an instrument ordained to settle the wilderness.
Focusing on the delivery of patient-centered care in the wilderness, instructors and practitioners of emergency medicine introduce many innovations to wilderness medicine, emergency medical services (EMS), and the conjoined subspecialty wilderness EMS (WEMS).
Abstract: In this essay, I examine how Tracy Ross and Cheryl Strayed, while seemingly echoing the American wilderness tradition, deviate from male-dominated wilderness discourse when they recollect their hiking experiences in the wilderness.
Even in rural Oregon, a majority wants more wilderness protected.
Currently, medical research in the wilderness helps to expand our understanding of conditions as diverse as congenital heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, sepsis, critical illness, and diabetes.
Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, today announced the publication of the seventh edition of Auerbachs Wilderness Medicine, a proven, practical and highly visual textbook that is the written foundation for the specialty of wilderness medicine.
Due to widespread human developments, the world has encountered catastrophic declines in wilderness areas around the planet over the last two decades.
In 2008, a supermajority of the Utah State Legislature passed House Joint Resolution 10, which encouraged the United States Congress to not designate any additional federal wilderness areas in Utah.