wind factor


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wind factor

[′win ‚fak·tər]
(navigation)
In air navigation, a measure of the net effect of wind on the ground speed of an aircraft; it is the magnitude of the wind vector component parallel to the heading of an aircraft, averaged over the entire flight positive if a tailwind, negative if a headwind.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The seats are a little white, and there is the wind factor.
The high amount of moisture in the air coupled with low wind factor led to reduced transmission capacity.
05), due to the homogenizing effect of the wind factor in this shallow lagoon (maximum depth: 3 m).
On the last stages of the Kingdom Tower - above 800m - Mikati notes that the wind factor are larger than the factors at ground level - and that if you leave the cranes to slew, they will hit the building or each other.
The wind factor is especially an issue when you're waterfowling.
Asked why his fielders dropped so many catches, he said: ""I believe it was slightly tough because of the wind factor.
Mastering it is tricky, mainly because of the over enthusiastic wind factor.
Brussels suffer a massively bad press, the same way cabbage does (but the wind factor of Brussels seems to elevate it to "most hated" status).
It's a wide open venue and there always seems to be a wind factor due to the nearby sea," he noted.
My only concern was the possibility of my spare salad knife mauling an unsuspecting passer-by 50 metres below me, if the wind factor was to swing our table around.
If you didn't have the wind you probably would be okay with a -2C or -3C, but the wind factor is the big problem.
Peterhead manager Neale Cooper played down the wind factor.