wind stress

wind stress

[′win ‚stres]
(meteorology)
The drag or tangential force per unit area exerted on the surface of the earth by the adjacent layer of moving air.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr David Gwyther from the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania, and a contributor to the new research, said the study combined satellite images of the ice sheet, wind stress data, and oceanography observations, to determine the chain of events that bring warm water to the Totten.
In shallow tropical coastal areas, like the VRSNP, a high correlation is expected between wind stress and sea level.
Principal component analysis was used to define the alongshore and cross-shore components of the wind stress for each MB.
The advantage of using drogues or sails is that the slippage between the drifter and current motion due to wind stress is reduced.
In the theoretical study, we will need to develop a new theory in which the wind effects such as the wind stress and the wind-induced surface current are considered.
Cross sections were obtained from Gledistia tricanthos and Tilia americana that experienced mechanical wind stress primarily from just two directions, which resulted in elliptical stems.
Wind stress was used as an indication of wind mixing or turbulence because it can affect larval encounter rates with zooplankton prey and subsequent feeding, growth, and survival for each cohort.
The angle determined between the surface wind stress and the surface drift velocity differs in general from the angle obtained by the classical Ekman solution (Cushman-Roisin 1994).
In the north, where ice-dependent species are disappearing, sea ice cover has declined and wind stress has increased.
There are two main reasons for choosing this approach over what was done for GloSea3 (SST and wind stress perturbation of a central analysis) or at others centres such as ECMWF and MeteoFrance: First, perturbing a central analysis degrades the initial conditions (as demonstrated in Bowler et al.