wind tide

wind tide

[′win ‚tīd]
(oceanography)
The vertical rise in the still-water level on the leeward side of a body of water, particularly the ocean or other large body, caused by wind stresses on the surface of the water.
The difference in still-water level between the windward and leeward sides of such a body caused by wind stresses.
References in periodicals archive ?
The owner of Wind Tide says she "likes PayFast because the more she has on hand, the more she can sell, and the stock is paid for directly from the sale of that stock.
Outside of wind tides which cause changes in depths, there's no significant tidal influence from Ponce Inlet so water levels are generally stable.
There's almost always current of some degree in Haulover generated by wind tides pushing water from the Indian River or Mosquito Lagoon, as well as a slight effect from Ponce Inlet, 22 miles to the north.