wind-driven current

wind-driven current

[′win ¦driv·ən ′kə·rənt]
(oceanography)
References in periodicals archive ?
According to this, the wind-driven current is deflected with an angle [theta] to the right (clockwise) from the wind direction (for the Northern Hemisphere).
Wave- and wind-driven currents are important in the transport and dispersal of sediment and pollutants in the nearshore.
Visible from space and four times more powerful than the Gulf Stream, this wind-driven current circles Antarctica, separating the warmer waters of the subtropics from the polar waters around the continent, and reaching all the way from the surface to the ocean floor--five kilometres below.
We did a study regarding the variation of wind-driven current with the sea level and, for the same level, with the depth.
Whilst the currents in continental shelf seas, like the Irish Sea and North Sea, are dominated by the tide, there is evidence that much weaker wind-driven currents might be responsible for circulating key nutrients within the seas.
Geological Survey says the low oxygen levels may result from wind-driven currents.
A new study suggests that these enigmatic waters expand when their permafrost banks melt, rather than when wind-driven currents cause erosion, as scientists had proposed for decades.
Case studies include examples of wind-driven currents, fast-changing ecosystems under human pressure, transboundary management, and sustainable use and development.
For example, the role of wind-driven changes includes a review of how local wind-driven currents along a coast can, via the action of the Coriolis force, change coastal sea level, but does not describe how some wind-driven effects can propagate along continental boundaries as coastally trapped waves.
WHOI Senior Scientist and biological oceanographer Cheryl Ann Butman showed that wind-driven currents controlled the onshore and offshore transport of clam, snail, and worm larvae.
In documenting modern and ancient SMTDs (sandy slides, sandy slumps, and sandy debrites) and BCRS (deposits of thermohaline [contour] currents, wind-driven currents, and tidal currents), the author describes and interprets core and outcrop (1:20 to 1:50 scale) from 35 case studies worldwide (which include 32 petroleum reservoirs), totaling more than 10,000 m in cumulative thickness, carried out during the past 36 years (1974-2010).
This is evidence of what caused this year's hypoxia - an onslaught of nutrients brought to shallow coastal waters by wind-driven currents, whose decomposing structures suck up available oxygen.