windward


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to windward: Windward Islands, Windward and leeward

windward

Chiefly nautical
1. of, in, or moving to the quarter from which the wind blows
2. to windward of advantageously situated with respect to
3. the windward point
4. the side towards the wind

Windward

On the side exposed to the wind; the opposite of leeward.

windward

[′win·wərd]
(meteorology)
In the general direction from which the wind blows.
References in classic literature ?
the clouds broke away to windward, and we had the advantage of a full moon--a piece of good fortune which served wonderfully to cheer our drooping spirits.
The Italians were rowing up the starboard side of the ship, and we were hauled close on the wind and slowly edging out from the ship as we worked to windward.
On the next tack to windward the Greek offered to change places with Charley.
On the row to windward they always gained on us, so that they were half-way down the ship's side on the row to leeward when we were passing the bow.
But the green light, which was all they could see, and which they could see only when they were on top of a wave, moved steadily away from them, withal it was working up to windward, and grew dim and dimmer.
He's deliberately working around us and to windward.
When we arrived at the head of the lagoon, we crossed a narrow islet, and found a great surf breaking on the windward coast.
It appears, from some old charts, that the long island to windward was formerly separated by wide channels into several islets; this fact is likewise indicated by the trees being younger on these portions.
And young Powell turned his eyes to windward with a catch in his breath.
From regarding me curiously, he turned his head and glanced out over the leaden sea to windward.
16, 2015 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- America's Capital Partners (ACP) Fund II has acquired Windward Fairways I & II in Alpharetta, GA.
An industry solution, Windward is now bringing its data and analytics to the world of finance, giving financial institutions, including hedge funds and commodity traders, access to accurate, real-time information on the physical flows of seaborne commodities, which serve as lead indicators to the financial world.