winter

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winter

1. 
a. the coldest season of the year, between autumn and spring, astronomically from the December solstice to the March equinox in the N hemisphere and at the opposite time of year in the S hemisphere
b. (as modifier): winter pasture
2. the period of cold weather associated with the winter

What does it mean when you dream about winter?

A winter dreamscape could indicate the dreamer’s favorite time of the year for fun and frolic. However, winter is also a season in which many people experience depression. This dream could indicate an emotional withdrawal from a personal relationship or a withdrawing of one’s emotional investment in the workplace.

winter

[′win·tər]
(astronomy)
The period from the winter solstice, about December 22, to the vernal equinox, about March 21; popularly and for most meteorological purposes, winter is taken to include December, January, and February in the Northern Hemisphere, and June, July, and August in the Southern Hemisphere.

first point of Capricornus

first point of Capricornusclick for a larger image
That point on the ecliptic occupied by the sun at the maximum southerly declination. Sometimes called the December solstice, the first point of Capricornus. The same as the winter solstice, the first point of Libra. The point of the intersection of the ecliptic and the celestial equator (equinoctial). When the sun is moving from the north to the south direction. It is denoted by the symbol image. Also called the winter, or December, equinox.

Maidyarem (Maidhyairya; Mid-Year or Winter Feast)

December-January, May, June; 16th-20th days of Dae, the 10th Zoroastrian month
Maidyarem is the fifth of the six great seasonal feasts, known as gahambars, of the Zoroastrian religion. It was traditionally celebrated at a point in the agricultural year when, due to extreme cold, all work came to a halt. The name comes from the word airya, which means "rest."
The six gahambars were typically joyous festivals that included such activities as special rituals and prayers, and the sharing of food. Although they lasted five days, the fifth day was the only one spent in actual celebration; the other four were for preparation and anticipation of the day's feasting, when families or neighborhoods would get together. These seasonal feasts were designed to give those who worked from dawn to dusk on farms a respite from their labors. Today, with so many Zoroastrians living in urban areas, the importance of the gahambars has diminished.
The Zoroastrian calendar has 12 months of 30 days each, plus five extra days at the end of the year. Because of discrepancies in the calendars used by widely separated Zoroastrian communities around the world, there are now three different calendars in use, and Maidyarem can fall either in December-January, May, or June according to the Gregorian calendar.
There are only about 100,000 followers of Zoroastrianism today, and most of them live in northwestern India or Iran. Smaller communities exist in Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Canada, the U.S., England, and Australia.
SOURCES:
RelHolCal-2004, p. 69

Winter

Boreas
the north wind; associated with winter. [Rom. Myth.: Hall, 130]
crane
pictorial emblem in Buddhist tradition. [Animal Symbol-ism: Jobes, 378]
Ded Moroz
personification of winter; “Grandfather Frost.” [Russ. Folklore: Misc.]
goat
zodiacally belongs to December; hence, winter. [Astrology: Hall, 139]
Hiems
personification; portrayed as old and decrepit. [Rom. Myth.: LLEI, I: 322]
Jack Frost
personification of winter. [Pop. Culture: Misc.]
Old Man Winter
personification of winter. [Pop. Culture: Misc.]
old man wrapped in cloak
personification of winter. [Art: Hall, 130]
Persephone
the period of her stay (winter) with Hades. [Gk. Myth.: Espy, 28]
References in classic literature ?
Months afterward Jim Burden arrived at my apartment one stormy winter afternoon, with a bulging legal portfolio sheltered under his fur overcoat.
Reed, when there was no company, dined early) the cold winter wind had brought with it clouds so sombre, and a rain so penetrating, that further out-door exercise was now out of the question.
Such legends as these, together with the singularity of her isolated existence, her age, and the infirmity that each added winter flung upon her, made Mistress Dudley the object both of fear and pity; and it was partly the result of either sentiment that, amid all the angry license of the times, neither wrong nor insult ever fell upon her unprotected head.
Plans for the winter Salmon River Abundance of salmon west of the mountains New arrangements Caches Cerre's detachment Movements in Fontenelle's camp Departure of the Blackfeet Their fortunes Wind Mountain streams Buckeye, the Delaware hunter, and the grizzly bear Bones of murdered travellers Visit to Pierre's Hole Traces of the battle Nez Perce Indians Arrival at Salmon River
Ha'af my mother's folks they live scattered inside o' Pennsylvania, an' Uncle Salters he visits araound winters.
pauses -- turns over some leaves, and resumes) "No lingering winters there, nor snow, nor shower -- "But Ocean ever to refresh mankind "Breathes the shrill spirit of the western wind.
At the end of two winters he had naturally had a good many of various kinds--his study of American society had yielded considerable fruit.
If December passes without snow, we indignantly demand to know what has become of our good old-fashioned winters, and talk as if we had been cheated out of something we had bought and paid for; and when it does snow, our language is a disgrace to a Christian nation.
But one phrase stuck in my memory and served as the nucleus about which I grouped my subsequent inferences: "Guess he's been in Starkfield too many winters.
If I'd only been as prudent at your age May would have been dancing at the Assemblies now, instead of spending her winters in a wilderness with an old invalid.
One of these friends was an American lady who had spent several winters at Geneva, where she had placed her children at school.
You can't imagine what the winters are like in those countries, so long and dark and cold.