wiretap


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wiretap

[′wīr‚tap]
(communications)
A secretly made and concealed connection to a telephone line, office intercommunication line, or other wiring system, for the purpose of monitoring conversations and activities in a room from a remote location without knowledge of the participants, legally or illegally.
References in periodicals archive ?
The special prosecutor law says all the wiretap material should be handed over to the special prosecutor.
There has been little open criticism of the wiretaps.
Hochman stated: "To obtain a valid wiretap, the government has to surmount the highest hurdles to get court permission for this very intrusive invasion into a citizen's privacy.
However, after Google was sued by several individuals saying the company had violated the Wiretap Act, the company defended its actions saying they were legal because the only data it collected was data that was unencrypted and freely available to the general public over unsecured wireless networks.
Set minimum of NodeNum is 5 and wiretappers wiretap on node 2, 3 and 4 (There is no difference between nodes in wireless network).
The Rajaratnam case could easily herald the broader use of white-collar wiretaps, and not just in the insider trading arena.
United States, that a wiretap on a suspect's phone wasn't a search, since it required no physical intrusion on the target's property.
Even Pat Leahy, who sided with Feingold at the Judiciary hearings--saying it made no sense to assert that Congress unwittingly approved wiretaps, as the Administration claims--is noncommittal on censure.
This loophole in the roving wiretap provision arguably epitomizes the reason for the inclusion of the sunsets in the first place.
In contrast, a criminal Title III wiretap must be supported by probable cause to believe that a specific individual, using an identified phone or location, is committing a particular crime.