wiretapping

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wiretapping

A form of eavesdropping involving physical connection to the communications channels to breach the confidentiality of communications. For example, many poorly-secured buildings have unprotected telephone wiring closets where intruders may connect unauthorized wires to listen in on phone conversations and data communications. See ECPA.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even though a group of non-governmental organizations submitted a request for an investigation into the leaks to the attorney general in late December, as did former parliamentarian Mustapha al-Naggar, one of the public figures targeted by the wiretaps, the prosecutor has yet to open an investigation.
Hochman and Saunders argued that the FBI agent who applied for the wiretaps had withheld key information from the issuing judge, including the fact that multiple suspects named in the wiretap application had previously cooperated with the government in similar cases and could therefore potentially serve as reliable informants in the current investigation.
Ning Cai and Haowei Yang first proposed a communication system on a wiretap network(CSWN) and proved a necessary condition of implementing network security by network coding, meaning that source node sends message to destination node without leaking out any useful information to wiretapper [1].
The vacancy opened after the disciplinary dismissal of Nikolay Kokinov by the Supreme Judicial Council (VSS) due to a scandalous wiretap leak.
The Rajaratnam case could easily herald the broader use of white-collar wiretaps, and not just in the insider trading arena.
It's a 'comprehensive wiretap system that intercepts wire-line phones, cellular phones, SMS and push-to-talk systems,' says Steven Bellovin, a Columbia University computer science professor and longtime surveillance expert.
Kerr says sweeping viral searches would run afoul of existing wiretap laws, which raise more stringent barriers to "unauthorized access" than is imposed by the current judicial interpretation of the Fourth Amendment.
Even Pat Leahy, who sided with Feingold at the Judiciary hearings--saying it made no sense to assert that Congress unwittingly approved wiretaps, as the Administration claims--is noncommittal on censure.
Bush is currently under the limelight for authorizing wiretaps of ordinary citizens.
The legislation also restricts the government's powers, requiring a higher standard of proof for investigators to demand business records, greater judicial oversight, and increased reporting to Congress on antiterrorism operations and limits on roving wiretaps.
A former Fox FX vice president who after being fired used wiretaps to listen in on calls by executives from the cable TV network was sentenced Tuesday to three years' probation.