wisteria

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Related to wisterias: Japanese Wisteria

wisteria

(wĭstēr`ēə) or

wistaria

(–târ`–), any plant of the genus Wisteria, woody twining vines of the family Leguminosae (pulsepulse,
in botany, common name for members of the Fabaceae (Leguminosae), a large plant family, called also the pea, or legume, family. Numbering about 650 genera and 17,000 species, the family is third largest, after the asters and the orchids.
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 family), cultivated and highly esteemed for the beautiful pendent clusters of pealike flowers, lilac, white, or pink. There are two species (W. frutescens and W. macrostachya) native to the United States, found mostly in the Southeast, but the showier Asian species are the most commonly cultivated. One variety of the Japanese wisteria (W. floribunda var. macrobotrys) has flower clusters up to 3 ft (1 m) long. Wisteria is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Leguminosae.

Wisteria

 

large, woody deciduous vines of the genus Wisteria of the family Leguminosae. The name “wisteria” is most often applied to W. sinensis (Glycine sinensis). The plant is 15-18 m long, with drooping branches and oddly pinnate leaves up to 30 cm long, with seven to 13 leaflets; the blue fragrant blossoms are gathered into pendulous clusters. It is found in forests in the provinces of Hupeh and Szechwan in China and has long been used in ornamental horticulture. W. floribunda (from Japan) and several other species are also called wisteria. Under cultivation forms of wisteria have been produced with white, light-purple, and dark-purple blossoms. In the USSR wisteria is cultivated on the Black Sea coasts of the Crimea and the Caucasus.

wisteria

woody vine found in Southern gardens. [Am. Culture: EB, X: 716]

wisteria

any twining leguminous woody climbing plant of the genus Wisteria, of E Asia and North America, having blue, purple, or white flowers in large drooping clusters
References in periodicals archive ?
Nor do I - as some Wisteria lovers do - attempt move it inside the greenhouse in winter, only to return it to the wall after the last frosts.
Wisteria floribunda from Japan is very hardy and vigorous, and capable of producing the longest racemes of flowers.
At long last, I reckon I've cracked the secret of why wisteria flowers start to open and then fall off.
Japanese wisterias are most effective when grown on pergolas so the long flower clusters can hang freely.
So far, cases have been contained to south London on isolated wisteria plants, but in other parts of the world the creepy-crawly has been known to spread to sycamore and fruit trees.
Wisterias MUST be pruned twice a year, depending on whether they are grown against a wall, fence or over a pergola, otherwise they become monsters.
I am even friends with snails because at long last I reckon I've cracked the secret of why wisteria flowers start to open and then fall off.
Q HOW long does it take for wisteria to cover a wall and flower?
Though the flowering period is short for wisterias they are among the most beautiful of all climbers and ideal for walls, fences, arches or pergolas.
QMY DAUGHTER'S new garden has an overgrown wisteria.