wisteria

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Related to wisterias: Japanese Wisteria

wisteria

(wĭstēr`ēə) or

wistaria

(–târ`–), any plant of the genus Wisteria, woody twining vines of the family Leguminosae (pulsepulse,
in botany, common name for members of the Fabaceae (Leguminosae), a large plant family, called also the pea, or legume, family. Numbering about 650 genera and 17,000 species, the family is third largest, after the asters and the orchids.
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 family), cultivated and highly esteemed for the beautiful pendent clusters of pealike flowers, lilac, white, or pink. There are two species (W. frutescens and W. macrostachya) native to the United States, found mostly in the Southeast, but the showier Asian species are the most commonly cultivated. One variety of the Japanese wisteria (W. floribunda var. macrobotrys) has flower clusters up to 3 ft (1 m) long. Wisteria is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Leguminosae.

Wisteria

 

large, woody deciduous vines of the genus Wisteria of the family Leguminosae. The name “wisteria” is most often applied to W. sinensis (Glycine sinensis). The plant is 15-18 m long, with drooping branches and oddly pinnate leaves up to 30 cm long, with seven to 13 leaflets; the blue fragrant blossoms are gathered into pendulous clusters. It is found in forests in the provinces of Hupeh and Szechwan in China and has long been used in ornamental horticulture. W. floribunda (from Japan) and several other species are also called wisteria. Under cultivation forms of wisteria have been produced with white, light-purple, and dark-purple blossoms. In the USSR wisteria is cultivated on the Black Sea coasts of the Crimea and the Caucasus.

wisteria

woody vine found in Southern gardens. [Am. Culture: EB, X: 716]

wisteria

any twining leguminous woody climbing plant of the genus Wisteria, of E Asia and North America, having blue, purple, or white flowers in large drooping clusters
References in periodicals archive ?
All species of Wisteria can be trained to cover an expanse of sunny wall, even growing out of large containers so long as the plant is well watered and fed with a balanced fertilizer each year.
Wisteria sinensis from China (pictured) is strong-growing and produces racemes ( trailing stems of flowers ( 30cm (12in) long.
Believe it or not, wisterias are best planted in May or early June and I would advise purchasing when you can see the quality of bloom the plant is capable of producing.
Ensure the roots are teased out if they are circling the pot and plant at the same level the wisteria was in its container.
Japanese wisterias are most effective when grown on pergolas so the long flower clusters can hang freely.
So far, cases have been contained to south London on isolated wisteria plants, but in other parts of the world the creepy-crawly has been known to spread to sycamore and fruit trees.
Over the years you have probably seen some outstanding specimen wisterias throughout the Mercury area.
Choose a rich medium-loam soil in a spot where there is plenty of space for extensive root growth and it'll perform to its best, but wisterias do amazingly well on almost any soil.
Q HOW long does it take for wisteria to cover a wall and flower?
And you don't have to live on a film set or get friendly with a hunky young gardener to have that Wisteria Lane look in your garden.
But so rewarding are wisterias in other ways that I would never discourage anyone from planting one although I would attach a caveat.