witness


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witness:

see evidenceevidence,
in law, material submitted to a judge or a judicial body to resolve disputed questions of fact. The rules discussed in this article were developed in England for use in jury trials.
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Witness

 

in law, a person summoned by a court or investigating authority to give testimony concerning circumstances that are known to the person and are important for resolving a criminal or civil case. In Soviet law, a witness may be any person, with certain exceptions, regardless of age or relationship—family or other—to persons involved in a case. The exceptions include defendants in criminal cases, representatives in civil cases, and people who for mental or physical reasons are unable to perceive the facts or give accurate testimony. The accused may not be questioned as a witness on the circumstances surrounding the act for which he or his accomplices are accused. A witness cannot be replaced and is not subject to challenge.

A witness must appear when summoned and must given complete and truthful testimony. Failure to appear without good reason can result in a fine or compulsory appearance. A witness is criminally responsible for giving deliberately false testimony, for refusing to answer, or for giving evasive answers. He has the right to give testimony in his native language, and at a pretrial investigation he may look over the report of his questioning and request corrections and supplements. A witness may also request an appeal of the actions of an investigator. A witness summoned to testify continues to receive his normal wages and is compensated for traveling expenses and lodging.

Witness

cranes of Ibycus
called on by the dying poet to bear witness, the birds lead to the murderers’ conviction. [Gk. Myth.: NCE, 1307]

witness

1. a person or thing giving or serving as evidence
2. a person who testifies, esp in a court of law, to events or facts within his own knowledge
3. a person who attests to the genuineness of a document, signature, etc., by adding his own signature
4. bear witness
a. to give written or oral testimony
b. to be evidence or proof of
References in classic literature ?
Having concluded his statement the witness proceeded to identify the remains of the deceased.
Before returning to London, the witness produced references which gave him an excellent character.
You will naturally be anxious to hear of the witness, Miss Manette.
It's perfectly useless, my Lord, attempting to get at any evidence through the impenetrable stupidity of this witness.
I have no objection to admit, my Lord,' said Serjeant Snubbin, 'if it will save the examination of another witness, that Mr.
The last witness said it was," commented the counsel, with unscrupulous swiftness.
The third, witness called by Sir Walter Cowdray was the little Catholic clergyman, so little, compared with the others, that his head seemed hardly to come above the box, so that it was like cross-examining a child.
You are a most extraordinary witness," he said; "but there is something about you that makes me think you are trying to tell the truth.
The appearance of the next witness created a marked sensation in the Court.
What the witness had herself seen and observed of the relations between the husband and wife was the only evidence that they could receive.
I will not have it cast in my teeth, at some future day, that Madame Fosco acted under my coercion, and was, in plain fact, no witness at all.
No consideration of less importance than my consideration for Laura would have induced me to consent to be a witness at all.