witness

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witness:

see evidenceevidence,
in law, material submitted to a judge or a judicial body to resolve disputed questions of fact. The rules discussed in this article were developed in England for use in jury trials.
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Witness

 

in law, a person summoned by a court or investigating authority to give testimony concerning circumstances that are known to the person and are important for resolving a criminal or civil case. In Soviet law, a witness may be any person, with certain exceptions, regardless of age or relationship—family or other—to persons involved in a case. The exceptions include defendants in criminal cases, representatives in civil cases, and people who for mental or physical reasons are unable to perceive the facts or give accurate testimony. The accused may not be questioned as a witness on the circumstances surrounding the act for which he or his accomplices are accused. A witness cannot be replaced and is not subject to challenge.

A witness must appear when summoned and must given complete and truthful testimony. Failure to appear without good reason can result in a fine or compulsory appearance. A witness is criminally responsible for giving deliberately false testimony, for refusing to answer, or for giving evasive answers. He has the right to give testimony in his native language, and at a pretrial investigation he may look over the report of his questioning and request corrections and supplements. A witness may also request an appeal of the actions of an investigator. A witness summoned to testify continues to receive his normal wages and is compensated for traveling expenses and lodging.

Witness

cranes of Ibycus
called on by the dying poet to bear witness, the birds lead to the murderers’ conviction. [Gk. Myth.: NCE, 1307]

witness

1. a person or thing giving or serving as evidence
2. a person who testifies, esp in a court of law, to events or facts within his own knowledge
3. a person who attests to the genuineness of a document, signature, etc., by adding his own signature
4. bear witness
a. to give written or oral testimony
b. to be evidence or proof of
References in periodicals archive ?
The state Supreme Court's decision overturned two lower court rulings that had allowed prosecutors to keep secret the names of three witnesses to a 1993 jail house murder of Jose Uribe, who was fatally stabbed in his cell.
Because witnesses play such a critical role in the courtroom, attorneys should make witness preparation a pivotal element of trial planning.
Indeed, low-level employees are often perceived by the government as potential key witnesses due to their familiarity with company records and routine office functions and practices.
Company witnesses had given testimony regarding the document under the assumption that it was a company document because it had the corporation's name at the top of it.
The French judicial system actually permitted witnesses a great deal of freedom to craft their depositions as they chose.
To respect the right of the Respondent, the investigation should not proceed until he or she has at least had an opportunity to contest the claims of the Petitioner, to secure the services of an advocate and nominate witnesses.
Investigators should take nothing for granted; managers must ensure that investigators interview those individuals whose jobs require them to volunteer information, as well as locate and question witnesses who departed the area.
Some of these rules apply to CPAs who are targets of an investigation, some apply to CPAs as witnesses and still others apply to CPAs who might be asked to perform forensic accounting for an investigation.
For the first time, specially-trained staff from the Cheshire Crown Prosecution Service and police will provide a single point of contact for victims and witnesses.
Perez, who failed multiple lie detector tests, together with poor witnesses, statute-of-limitation problems and a political environment eager to put the scandal behind the city all may have contributed.
To help triers of fact understand the impact of different types of financial transactions or attach a measurable value to a plaintiff's injury CPAs often are called on to serve as expert witnesses.