wit

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wit

1. the talent or quality of using unexpected associations between contrasting or disparate words or ideas to make a clever humorous effect
2. speech or writing showing this quality
3. a person possessing, showing, or noted for such an ability, esp in repartee
References in periodicals archive ?
MacAulay is a master of the ad lib and the instant witticism, a result of his years of experience on the live comedy circuit
The exhibition was better at conveying witticism and pretty good as art.
She was a source of wisdom and witticism, as well as a pillar of strength to all those who knew her.
What is more, I do not think it is entirely appropriate to make headlines from these issues which appear to be geared towards the tabloid witticism - whatever else and whatever one's opinion of the acts involved, the story is certainly not in any way funny.
The final conclusion is twofold: first, that Wilde's witticisms are more quoted because they can be more easily detached from their context; second, that Wilde produces more of the type of witticism that Saki produces, but these remain unquoted, for the same reason as Saki's.
From her perfectly dishevelled locks, lanky legs as endless as the M6, her slightly undone, androgynous style, penchant for quirky clothes, and her pin-sharp British witticism.
Anything by Jeremy Clarkson - my husband buys his books and regularly howls with laughter at some Clarkson witticism or other.
You can expect really demanding tests," he said, after a witticism to the effect that last July's tests had not "resisted" the stress.
Every witticism and each brilliant social observation are balanced by a sliver of painful truth that brings about a lump in the listener's throat.
Invisible Crazy 8's focuses on the mood swings of a "mad" cow, with tongue-in-cheek humor, irony, and witticism.
My one regret--I thank Ron Holsey for giving me a chance to repair some of the damage--is my ill-advised witticism about homophobic yokels at the Veterans of Foreign Wars.
Beyond this witticism lies the important, underexplored territory of il- and semi-literate understandings of selfhood in early modern England.