tarantula

(redirected from wolf spider)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

tarantula

(tərăn`chələ), name applied chiefly to species of the large, hairy spidersspider,
organism, mostly terrestrial, of the class Arachnida, order Araneae, with four pairs of legs and a two-part body consisting of a cephalothorax, or prosoma, and an unsegmented abdomen, or opisthosoma.
..... Click the link for more information.
 of the family Theraphosidae of North and South America, Africa, S and SE Asia, and Australia. The body of a tarantula may be as much as 4 in. (10 cm) long and, with legs extended, more than 10 in. (25.4 cm) across. The largest tarantulas may kill small vertebrates, but their usual food is other arthropods. The bite of a tarantula may be painful but is not usually dangerous to humans. Most tarantulas found in the United States are members of the genus Aphonopelma, the largest of which have leg spreads of up to 6 in. (15.2 cm). The smaller Texas brown tarantula, A. hentzi, may be found in the W United States as far north as Colorado, Kansas, and Missouri.

The name tarantula is also applied to the purse-web spiders (family Atypidae) and funnel-web spiders (Dipluridae and Hexathelidae) of the Old and New World, and sheet funnel-web spiders or dwarf tarantulas (Mecicobothriidae) of the New World; there is a tailless whip scorpion genus Tarantula. Originally the name was applied to a spider of the wolf spider family, Lycosa tarantula, of S Europe, whose bite was supposed to cause tarantism, a nervous condition characterized by hysteria; the best cure was believed to be strenuous and prolonged dancing of the tarantellatarantella
, Neapolitan folk dance that first appeared in Taranto, Italy, in the 17th cent. It had rapid 6–8 meter with an increasing tempo and was thought to cure the bite of the tarantula (Lycosa tarantula,
..... Click the link for more information.
. Spider families are classified in the phylum ArthropodaArthropoda
[Gr.,=jointed feet], largest and most diverse animal phylum. The arthropods include crustaceans, insects, centipedes, millipedes, spiders, scorpions, and the extinct trilobites.
..... Click the link for more information.
, class Arachnida, order Araneae.

Tarantula

 

any of several species of the family Lycosidae (the wolf spiders). Tarantulas live in holes as deep as 60 cm and hunt insects at night. All tarantulas are more or less poisonous but are not dangerous to man.

The USSR has one species, Lycosa singoriensis. It is up to 3.5 cm long and lives in deserts, semideserts, and forest steppes. It reproduces at the end of summer; the female lays eggs in an egg sac, which she guards. After hatching, the young spiders perch on the female’s abdomen, remaining there for some time. The bite of L. singoriensis is as painful as the sting of a hornet and causes swelling.

tarantula

[tə′ran·chə·lə]
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of various large hairy spiders of the araneid suborder Mygalomorphae.
Any of the wolf spiders comprising the family Lycosidae.

Tarantula

[tə′ran·chə·lə]
(astronomy)

tarantula

spider with a deadly venom. [Zoology: NCE, 2695]

tarantula

1. any of various large hairy mostly tropical spiders of the American family Theraphosidae
2. a large hairy spider, Lycosa tarentula of S Europe, the bite of which was formerly thought to cause tarantism
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Tobacco hornworm caterpillars use some of the nicotine in their food to produce a smoker's breath strong enough to drive away predatory wolf spiders.
The wolf spiders were relatively uncommon in the pine forests; of these, most were members of the genus Pirata.
In the wolf spider, Rabidosa rabida, we have demonstrated that larger individuals are found with prey more often than smaller individuals.
The effects of prey chemical cues on patch residence time in the wolf spider Trochosa parthenus (Chamberlin) (Lycosidae) and the lynx spider Oxyopes salticus Hentz (Oxyopidae).
A wolf spider mother can carry as many as 200 babies at one time.
The wolf spider genus Allocosa in North and Central America (Araneae: Lycosidae).
The Wolf Spiders, Nurseryweb Spiders, and Lynx Spiders of Canada and Alaska, Araneae: Lycosidae, Pisauridae, and Oxyopidae.
The adult female wolf spider (Schizocosa ocreata) releases a dragline of silk when walking which is known to possess pheromones.
The effects of prey chemical cues on patch residence time in the wolf spider Trochosa parthenus (Cahmberlin) (Lycosidae) and the lynx spider Oxyopes salticus Hentz (Oxyopidae).
Two Kaua'i Cave Animals On April 9, we designated critical habitat for the Kaua'i cave wolf spider (Adelocosa anops) and the Kaua'i cave amphipod (Spelaeorchestia koloana), two eyeless invertebrates adapted to life underground.
Kauai cave wolf spider (Adelocosa anops) and Kauai cave amphipod (Spelaeorchestia koloana), two invertebrates known only from the Hawaiian island of Kaua'i, on March 27;