woodworm


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

woodworm

1. any of various insect larvae that bore into wooden furniture, beams, etc., esp the larvae of the furniture beetle, Anobium punctatum, and the deathwatch beetle
2. the condition caused in wood by any of these larvae
References in periodicals archive ?
If the holes look new, the woodworm is probably active, but if they are old and dusty you're probably all right.
It is mandatory in France to use chemicals to treat woodworm but not only were the sprays a potential health hazard, it was impossible to achieve 100% effectiveness.
People also said that Rivaldo had woodworm in his knees and that he was only interested in playing for Barcelona.
The term woodworm is given to the one beetle, Anobium Punctatum, also known as The Common Furniture beetle.
WHEN a prospective buyer asks a surveyor to do a building survey the three most common things they worry about are subsidence, dry rot and woodworm.
Start by examining the floor joists and roof timbers in your loft for things like damp and woodworm.
Some boards may have been ravaged by woodworm (if there's a lot of dust, the woodworm is probably still active and will need treating by a timber infestation specialist) or simply age; others may have been replaced with modern boards that don't match.
The church is facing a large bill for replacing the floor in the parish centre due to woodworm.
A breakfast table for sale in Liverpool about three years ago, and not in tip-top condition having suffered woodworm blight at some time in the central column, brought more than pounds 4,000.
This will be to repair problems with damp and woodworm.
How, for example, can you compare Ivory Towers School for Young Ladies and Gentlemen, which has heated biros for all, with Woodworm Secondary, only three bog standard portacabins from being a hedge school?