woolly


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woolly

(sometimes US), wooly
1. consisting of, resembling, or having the nature of wool
2. covered or clothed in wool or something resembling it
3. Botany covered with long soft whitish hairs
4. US recalling the rough and lawless period of the early West of America (esp in the phrase wild and woolly)
5. Western US and Austral an informal word for sheep
References in periodicals archive ?
com/4-iconic-extinct-american-animals-dire-wolves-saber-toothed-tigers-2556144) iconic extinct animal , many people may have the idea that woolly mammoths are much older than they really are, perhaps as old as the dinosaurs.
To date, hemlock woolly adelgid has been found in Digby, Yarmouth and Shelburne counties.
And these Russian scientists, the Zimovs, have shown since the 80s that if you repopulate it with herbivores from the Pleistocene era -- and they're using tanks to mimic woolly mammoths and they're putting bison there -- they've managed to lower the temperature of the tundra by 15 degrees.
Repopulating the woolly mammoth in an isolated region of Siberia is the brainchild of Russian scientist Sergey Zimov, who has slowly been collecting mammals that can survive the area's frigid conditions such as reindeer, musk oxen and moose.
I am as pleased as punch that my upcycled woolly wares will be going back down to London with Jeremy and Laura.
Researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks found that the last woolly mammoths perished on an island in the Bering Sea about 5,600 years ago.
A group of woolly mammoths, the huge Ice Age mammals that lived and roamed the frigid tundra steppes of northern Asia, Europe and North America, are seen in this undated illustration provided courtesy of Giant Screen Films
Researchers deciphered the genomes of two woolly mammoths that died about 20,000 and 60,000 years ago.
Although essentially similar to the 2D platforming Yoshi-led games that have come before it, Woolly World takes a unique aesthetic and turns it into some incredible gameplay ideas.
This is fun to read aloud, and, although Lou looks a little bit like Polly Dunbar's Tilly, the woolly mammoth is a wonderful mass of scribbled crayon, and would perhaps tempt children to try drawing him.
DISCUSSION: Woolly hair was described first by Gossage in 1907 in a European family.