words per minute


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words per minute

[′wərdz pər ′min·ət]
(communications)
A measure of the speed with which messages can be transmitted by a telegraph system. Abbreviated WPM.
References in periodicals archive ?
RG presented more disfluencies (stuttering-like disfluencies, common disfluencies and speech discontinuity) and lower flow of syllables and words per minute compared to CG in both conditions, NAF and DAF (Table 3).
Although, the data points across the two phases showed an increase in correct words per minute, there was still some variability.
Table 1: Mean Words Read Correctly Per Minute before, during and after VSM Mean Words Per Minute Pre-VSM During VSM Post-VSM Total Increase Ben 36.
This is around 300 words per minute (5 fixations per second times 1.
Speaking at 200 words per minute, Renee said: "Oh my God, hold on.
The human eye can handle 25 per cent fewer words per minute when reading from a screen than from paper.
Just a year ago, Tony Guerrero, a student at San Antonio College in Texas, would have laughed at anyone who suggested he could achieve 170 typed words per minute on a computer.
With this tool, sales professionals can enter information faster by speaking 80 words per minute versus typing 20 words per minute, allowing them to spend more time with customers and less time on administrative duties.
According to Scansoft's descriptions, Dragon NaturallySpeaking turns speech into text at up to 160 words per minute and also allows users to control Microsoft Windows and their PC applications completely by voice, being tightly integrated with Microsoft Office.
Most people normally say approximately 120 words per minute, yet individuals can understand at twice that speed.
Augustine's phrase--as a "vendor of words" with a maximum speed of 20 words per minute.
An increase of two correct words per minute per week of instruction is considered a strong reading intervention for students reading between the first- and third-grade levels (Fuchs and Fuchs, 1993).