work ethic


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work ethic

a belief in the moral value of work (often in the phrase Protestant work ethic)
References in periodicals archive ?
His work ethic is un-f**king-believable, to the point where I would worry about him.
On-loan | "He is also learning that work ethic and you could see him last night, he has covered some distance.
My work ethic is a lot better, more serious and more understanding - it seems to be working well for me.
The Grammy award winner added that his experience of performing in pubs for 10 pounds a night before finding fame added "resilience and toughness" to his work ethics and if all the fortune was given him on the plate, he neither would have appreciated it nor survived it.
Corporate training stems from the work ethic of the individuals, conditions and principles that can be a tendency to use the Charter of Rights to align to make it close monitoring [5].
While talent seems to be an important prerequisite, Schulman identified an actor's temperament and work ethic over his inherent acting talent as a determination of professional longevity, citing a willingness to work as a major reason for the majority of success in the careers of the actors that she has worked with.
If your work ethic is better than the opposition, you give yourself a chance.
If players don't buy into our work ethic then they won't be accepted into the group," said Curle.
The company has an inspiring work ethic, rewarding success and not hesitating to invest in people.
He says that managers' work ethic at that time was not to "go the extra mile" and to leave early on Friday afternoons.
Indian tycoon Ratan Tata, owner of steel maker Corus and car manufacturer Jaguar Land Rover, said: "It's a work ethic issue.
The concept of work ethic has evolved from the writings of the early 20th century scholar, Max Weber (Weber, 1904-1905), who has been frequently credited with contributing to the success of capitalism in western society with what became known as the Protestant work ethic (PWE) (Chusmir and Koberg, 1988; Hill and Petty, 1995; Hirschfeld and Field, 2000; Kalberg, 1996).