work of art


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work of art

1. a piece of fine art, such as a painting or sculpture
2. something that may be likened to a piece of fine art, esp in beauty, intricacy, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Romantic emotion and personality, as redefined in Classicism, lose their status as mere genetic qualities and become real properties of the work of art.
Find a work of art that reminds you of an event from your childhood.
Criminals seems to have no difficulty understanding the importance and durability of the 'aura' of a work of art, especially if we accept the explanation that such works are stolen to earn kudos in the underworld.
But Work Of Art company secretary Alfred Homburger said: "The business never took off.
The appraisal must be prepared, signed and dated by a qualified appraiser who performs appraisals on a regular basis, is not a party to the transaction, is not the beneficiary or donee of the work of art and is not related (by employment, marriage or otherwise) to anyone involved in the transaction.
Most notably, the revised policy adopts November 17, 1970, the date on which the UNESCO Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export, and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property was signed, as the key date for determining whether an ancient work of art or archaeological material can be considered for acquisition.
I READ with interest and welcome the suggestion that there should be a huge work of art at the entrances to North Wales.
And, so, ANY REPRESENTATION OR CLAIM THAT THIS IS A WORK OF ART IS THE EXCLUSIVE.
the Artists' Quick Draw will feature 13 renowned western artists who will create a work of art while guests enjoy hors de oeuvres and observe the artists at work.
8 If you want, when you're finished, you can glue your work of art to a larger piece of black construction paper, creating a dramatic frame.
Using works of art by such artists as Piet Mondrian, Jan Steen, Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Vincent van Gogh, Wassily Kandinsky and others, Gillian Wolfe calls our attention to the differing points of focus possible in viewing a work of art.
Solicited from various experts in the field, the entries for each work of art are written in a clear, scholarly, yet readable style, each with pertinent bibliography for further study.