working


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

working

1. Maths a record of the steps by which the result of a calculation or the solution of a problem is obtained
3. (of a meal or occasion) during which business discussions are carried on

working

[′wərk·iŋ]
(communications)
Carrying on radio communication with a station by means of telegraphy, telephony, or facsimile for a purpose other than calling.
(mining engineering)
The whole strata excavated in working a seam.
Ground or rocks shifting under pressure and producing noise.
(navigation)
In sea ice navigation, making headway through an ice pack by boring, breaking, and slewing.

working

The alternate swelling and shrinking in seasoned wood, resulting from moisture content changes that occur with changes in relative humidity of the surrounding air; also called movement.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a 1995 Virginia Slims poll, just one in six women and one in five men were willing to express disapproval of mothers working while raising children; one in three explicitly approved, and the rest said that whatever the mother wanted to do was right.
A standard work week that is compressed into fewer than five days by working more hours each day.
I think of workers' rights not just in terms of recent trends in real wages or the latest decisions by the National Labor Relations Board but in the larger sense of the rewards and respect that working people receive, on and off the job.
Two weeks after the birth of her son Joshua, she was attending vocational school to be a medical assistant and working part time as a waitress.
Besides sizable increases in the working-age population, proportion of the working-age population that is either working or looking for work has been on an upward trend throughout the past four decades (chart 3).
Occupational stress and burnout amongst staff working with people with an intellectual disability.
some students may have been far enough along in the dropping out process to prefer working to schooling; or
While working capital improvements won't generate cash as quickly as tapping a line of credit, companies can unlock dramatic amounts of money from their operations in surprisingly short periods of time -- with no obligation to pay it back.
Working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender college students: A handbook for faculty and administrators (pp.
Rumours of the death of working class consciousness in Britain have, of course, been greatly exaggerated.
Employers are primarily counting on keeping people working longer and increasing productivity to minimize the impact of a work force shortage," said Dunnington.
The study reports that 653,300 working poor persons were found in Canada in 2001.