wrong

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wrong

1. (of a side, esp of a fabric) intended to face the inside so as not to be seen
2. Law
a. an infringement of another person's rights, rendering the offender liable to a civil action, as for breach of contract or tort
b. a violation of public rights and duties, affecting the community as a whole and actionable at the instance of the Crown
References in classic literature ?
Equally right or wrong is he who says that Napoleon went to Moscow because he wanted to, and perished because Alexander desired his destruction, and he who says that an undermined hill weighing a million tons fell because the last navvy struck it for the last time with his mattock.
Ah," he remarked, with a wry pucker of his mouth, "I see you still believe in such things as right and wrong.
If there be no law of nature, there is no right nor wrong.
Just the same, you're wrong on general principle," Grimshaw would oar in.
Your uncle was wrong to state his objections so roundly and inconsiderately as he did.
It's manifestly absurd to say that Hirsch can have made a mistake about a paper that nobody knew of but himself; or can have tried to help a foreign thief by telling him to fumble in the wrong drawer.
SOCRATES: Are we to say that we are never intentionally to do wrong, or that in one way we ought and in another way we ought not to do wrong, or is doing wrong always evil and dishonorable, as I was just now saying, and as has been already acknowledged by us?
When things went wrong, or I heard things, I used to think it was her fault, but, looking back, it's more mine.
The lines go wrong on purpose--like serpents doubling to escape.
is raised, and some long mistake, some complicated edifice of self-delusion, over- confidence, and wrong reasoning is brought down in a fatal shock, and the heart-searing experience of your ship's keel scraping and scrunching over, say, a coral reef.
Adam thought he perceived in them that notion of compensation for irretrievable wrong, that self-soothing attempt to make evil bear the same fruits as good, which most of all roused his indignation.
Rose did not know half the danger of such gifts and tastes as Charlie's, but felt instinctively that something must be wrong if Archie disapproved.