x-ray spectrum


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms.
Related to x-ray spectrum: electromagnetic spectrum

x-ray spectrum

[′eks ‚rā ‚spek·trəm]
(spectroscopy)
A display or graph of the intensity of x-rays, produced when electrons strike a solid object, as a function of wavelengths or some related parameter; it consists of a continuous bremsstrahlung spectrum on which are superimposed groups of sharp lines characteristic of the elements in the target.
References in periodicals archive ?
2011) Discovery of a cyclotron resonance feature in the X-ray spectrum of GX 304-1 with RXTE and Suzaku during outbursts detected by MAXI in 2010.
Once an X-ray spectrum is collected, a qualitative analysis is performed in order to determine the elements present.
The strong gravitational forces near the black hole alter the reflected X-ray spectrum.
Moreover, the beam electrons that backscatter from the specimen can also undergo inelastic scattering events with the environmental gas atoms, further contributing to the measured x-ray spectrum.
Finally, the X-ray spectrum of the source, that is, its signature in energy, is similar to what astronomers expect to see for a pulsar.
Enter Chandra's X-ray spectrum of V471 Tauri, a pre-cataclysmic binary that shines at about magnitude 9.
We have selected silver flake (or tin flake for preparing sulfides since sulfides reacts with silver) as a mounting medium since they have good electrical conductivity, bleed the charge and help to conduct away the heat generated from the electron beam sample interaction and do not add an excessive number of peaks to the x-ray spectrum at analysis time.
Astronomers find they can now see sharply and deeply enough in the X-ray spectrum to solve some long-standing mysteries and uncover some new ones.
Evidence for this idea comes from the elongation of the X-rays running from the top left to the bottom right and details of the X-ray spectrum.
An X-ray spectrum of GRB 011211, which went off last December 11th, shows promising signs of several expected elements, according to an April 4th Nature paper by Leicester University astronomer James N.
According to ASCA astronomer Hajime Inoue of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science in Tokyo, the emissions from active galaxies at these low energies don't match the relatively flat X-ray spectrum recorded by the telescope.
Capitalizing on the sensitivity of the Suzaku satellite, a team led by Yamaguchi and Midori Ozawa, a graduate student at Kyoto University, detected unusual features in the X-ray spectrum of IC 443, better known to amateur astronomers as the Jellyfish Nebula.