zygomatic bone

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zygomatic bone

[¦zī·gə¦mad·ik ′bōn]
(anatomy)
A bone of the side of the face below the eye; forms part of the zygomatic arch and part of the orbit in mammals. Also known as malar bone.
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However, primary calvarial and zygoma reconstruction is contraindicated when the paranasal sinuses are opened; moreover, alloplastic material exposure rate after radiotherapy is increased [40].
9) They reported that 22 patients underwent surgical management for isolated maxillary or zygoma fractures.
The dramatic triangular posterior extension of the zygoma of Oshwea resembles no other acridid we know, and certainly no other Catantopine that we have examined.
The anterior lobe is located below the zygoma, extending to the front of the buccinator, maxilla and the deep space of the quadrate muscle of the upper lip and zygomaticus major muscle.
perpolita zygoma of cingulum narrow; rami broad; apodemes slightly shorter than basal valves of penis moderately broad with obtuse apices.
Measurements were taken on both sides of the skull from the pterion to the midpoint of zygoma (MPZ) and to the frontozygomatic suture (FZS) using a Manutan[ digital vernier calipers with an accuracy of 0.
Origin of upper incisor root--within or posterior to the maxillary root of zygoma (1); level with or outside zygomatic root (2).
Remaining sections of the table address studies of the bony thorax, abdomen, upper and lower gastrointestinal and genitourinary systems, gallbladder and biliary ducts, lower and upper extremities, shoulder girdle, spine, pelvis and hip, skull, sinuses, facial, nasal, zygoma and mandible bones.
A 10-year-old 24 kg male patient with restricted mouth-opening presented to us for orbital sequestrectomy following an injury to his right eye and zygoma in an accident.
lt;/pre> <pre> Figure 3 Head and Neck General Information for School Nurses READ AND NECK Structures Involved Bones: Skull (occipital, parietal, frontal, temporal, sphenoid, nasal, zygoma, maxilla, mandible)
Other nonconformities occur when two tissue-depth tables claim to measure at the same location on the skull but have definitions different from each other and/or a so-called common knowledge definition, such as the root of the zygoma (Aulsebrook et al.