Aeneas

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Aeneas

(ē`nēəs, ĭnē`–), palsied man whom Peter cured in the Acts of the Apostles.

Aeneas

(ĭnē`əs), in Greek mythology, a Trojan, son of AnchisesAnchises
, in Greek mythology, member of the ruling family of Troy; father of Aeneas by Aphrodite. When Anchises boasted of the goddess's love, Zeus crippled or, in some versions of the legend, blinded him.
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 and Aphrodite. After the fall of Troy he escaped, bearing his aged father on his back. He stayed at Carthage with Queen Dido, then went to Italy, where his descendants founded Rome. The deeds of Aeneas are the substance of the great Roman epic, the Aeneid of VergilVergil
or Virgil
(Publius Vergilius Maro) , 70 B.C.–19 B.C., Roman poet, b. Andes dist., near Mantua, in Cisalpine Gaul; the spelling Virgil is not found earlier than the 5th cent. A.D. Vergil's father, a farmer, took his son to Cremona for his education.
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.

Aeneas

Trojan hero; legendary founder of Roman race. [Rom. Lit.: Aeneid]
See: Heroism

Aeneas

carried his father Anchises from burning Troy. [Rom. Lit.: Aeneid]
See: Loyalty
References in classic literature ?
But the son of Tydeus caught up a mighty stone, so huge and great that as men now are it would take two to lift it; nevertheless he bore it aloft with ease unaided, and with this he struck Aeneas on the groin where the hip turns in the joint that is called the "cup-bone.
And laughter-loving Venus answered, "Proud Diomed, the son of Tydeus, wounded me because I was bearing my dear son Aeneas, whom I love best of all mankind, out of the fight.
Not one whit did he fear the mighty god, so set was he on killing Aeneas and stripping him of his armour.
The son of Tydeus then gave way for a little space, to avoid the anger of the god, while Apollo took Aeneas out of the crowd and set him in sacred Pergamus, where his temple stood.
Aeneas the son of Anchises has fallen, he whom we held in as high honour as Hector himself.
Then Apollo sent Aeneas forth from his rich sanctuary, and filled his heart with valour, whereon he took his place among his comrades, who were overjoyed at seeing him alive, sound, and of a good courage; but they could not ask him how it had all happened, for they were too busy with the turmoil raised by Mars and by Strife, who raged insatiably in their midst.
As he spoke he hurled his spear and hit one of those who were in the front rank, the comrade of Aeneas, Deicoon son of Pergasus, whom the Trojans held in no less honour than the sons of Priam, for he was ever quick to place himself among the foremost.