Morph

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morph

[mȯrf]
(genetics)
An individual variant in a polymorphic population.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Morph

 

the minimal meaningful part of an utterance; a specific representation of a morpheme in a text; one of the variants of a morpheme with nonidentical elements, as in the Russian alternation:

(1) /nos/it’

(2) /nes/ti

(3) /nash/ivat’ [The above three infinitives all contain a morpheme having the basic meaning of “to carry” or “to wear.” Their meaning and usage differs according to their mode of action (in Russian, sposob deistviia; in German, Aktionsart).}

The choice of a morph depends upon its phonological or morphological environment and is subject either to the rules of complementary distribution, as in English plural formants /-s/, /-z/, and /-Iz/, or to the rule of free variation, as in Russian bel/oi/ sten/oi/bel/oiu/ sten/oiu/ (instrumental singular of belaia stena, “white wall“). The morphs of a single morpheme are known as its allomorphs.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

morphing

The gradual transforming of one image into another. Although the conversion may only take a second, all the interim stages are visible. Common morphing sequences are changing an inanimate object into an animal, such as from a car to a tiger. Morphing is also done with similar objects; for example, transforming one car model into another. The term comes from metamorphosis, which means a profound change.

Mark the Prominent Points
Morphing software works by marking the prominent points around the edges, tips and corners of the objects in the before and after images. The points are used to mathematically compute the in-between stages from one object to the other. See tweening.


Plotting the Points
The prominent points of both the before and after images are marked in Gryphon's Morph software, which computes all the in-between stages. (Image courtesy of Gryphon Software Corporation.)






A Morphing Sequence
This morphing was performed by Andover's VideoCraft program. The start, end and three in- between stages were captured for this example. (Images courtesy of Andover Advanced Technologies.)


A Morphing Sequence
This morphing was performed by Andover's VideoCraft program. The start, end and three in- between stages were captured for this example. (Images courtesy of Andover Advanced Technologies.)


A Morphing Sequence
This morphing was performed by Andover's VideoCraft program. The start, end and three in- between stages were captured for this example. (Images courtesy of Andover Advanced Technologies.)


A Morphing Sequence
This morphing was performed by Andover's VideoCraft program. The start, end and three in- between stages were captured for this example. (Images courtesy of Andover Advanced Technologies.)


A Morphing Sequence
This morphing was performed by Andover's VideoCraft program. The start, end and three in- between stages were captured for this example. (Images courtesy of Andover Advanced Technologies.)
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