1,3-butadiene


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1,3-butadiene

[¦wən ¦thrē ‚byüd·ə′dī·ēn]
(organic chemistry)
C4H6 A colorless gas, boiling point ‒4.41°C, a major product of the petrochemical industry; used in the manufacture of synthetic rubber, latex paints, and nylon.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to DNA damage, 1,3-butadiene also causes alterations in gene expression, bulk DNA methylation, and bulk histone modifications in mouse lung and liver tissues, but not in kidney (Chappell et al.
2], benzene, ethylbenzene, and 1,3-butadiene models from fixed-site monitoring data and found that a combination of data sources and methods to capture background, regional, and local-scale pollution variation improved exposure assessment over traditional IDW interpolation approaches.
With the other information available for the 188 NATA air toxics, the leading identified carcinogens, in generally descending order of magnitude of effect and certainty of linkage, are formaldehyde, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, naphthalene, 1,3-butadiene, arsenic compounds, chromium compounds, coke oven emissions, acetaldehyde, acrylonitrile, ethylene oxide, tetrachloroethylene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, ethylbenzene, nickel compounds, 1,3-dichloropropene, and methylene chloride.
If additional studies--including studies of female mice, other mouse strains, and other animals--repeat these findings, this would indicate multiple modes of carcinogenicity for 1,3-butadiene and could lead to establishment of specific biomarkers for epigenetic damage that could be used in future toxicity and exposure assessments.
The gaseous olefin 1,3-butadiene (BD) is a major high-volume industrial chemical monomer widely used in the production of synthetic rubber, resins, and plastics (Himmelstein et al.
Model 3, which combines home and workplace measurements, in this study explains less variability than does model 1, which considers only home concentrations, except for 1,3-butadiene, p-isopropyltoluene, styrene, and ethylbenzene.
Group 2 includes benzene, formaldehyde, chloroform, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, methylene chloride, trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, 1,3-butadiene, and acetaldehyde.
The exceptions were 1,3-butadiene and nickel, which had > 60% detects in NYC, and in LA, 1,3-butadiene and trichloroethylene (TCE), which had > 80% detects.
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in combustion residues from 1,3-butadiene.
An epidemiologic study submitted to OSHA by the synthetic rubber industry in late 1995 demonstrated an excess risk of cancer among workers exposed to 1,3-butadiene.
The interest in 1,3-butadiene (BD) is not a new topic of concern within the environmental community.
More recently, benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and pesticides have been etiologically associated (Daniels et al.