100BaseVG


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100BaseVG

(networking)
A 100 MBps Ethernet standard specified to run over four pairs of category 3 UTP wires (known as voice grade, hence the "VG"). It is also called 100VG-AnyLAN because it was defined to carry both Ethernet and token ring frame types.

100BaseVG was originally proposed by Hewlett-Packard, ratified by the ISO in 1995 and practically extinct by 1998.

100BaseVG started in the IEEE 802.3u committee as Fast Ethernet. One faction wanted to keep CSMA/CD in order to keep it pure Ethernet, even though the collision domain problem limited the distances to one tenth that of 10baseT. Another faction wanted to change to a polling architecture from the hub (they called it "demand priority") in order to maintain the 10baseT distances, and also to make it a deterministic protocol. The CSMA/CD crowd said, "This is 802.3 -- the Ethernet committee. If you guys want to make a different protocol, form your own committee". The IEEE 802.12 committee was thus formed and standardised 100BaseVG. The rest is history.
References in periodicals archive ?
A similar, rival standard is 100BaseVG (Voice Grade), backed by Hewlett-Packard, IBM and AT&T.
The other technologies that integrators believe will follow these three by 1997 include switched ethernet (today's number one choice), 100baseVG, full-duplex ethernet and fibre channel, a high-speed channel (with a British spelling) that uses fiber optic technology and a variety of cable types to interconnect computing devices in small network configurations at speeds of up to 1 gigabit per second.