16-bit computing

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16-bit computing

CPUs that process 16 bits as a single unit, compared to 8, 32 or 64. The first personal computers in the late 1970s used 8-bit CPUs but migrated to 16 bits with the IBM PC in 1981. In the mid-1980s, PCs jumped to 32 bits with the Intel 386, and the Mac debuted with the 32-bit Motorola 68000 CPU. See 8088, 386 and 68000.

The 16-bit CPUs are still used as embedded processors in myriad products that do not require the higher speed. However, over the years, a lot of design effort went into 32-bit CPUs, making them faster, more efficient, smaller and less expensive and competitive with 16-bit CPUs for numerous embedded applications. See 8-bit computing, 32-bit computing and bit specifications.


References in periodicals archive ?
Banana ketchup, rudimentary medical incubators, leprosy control programs, 16-bit computer microchips, hardier strains of rice, quick-drying ink: These are all discoveries contributed by Filipino scientists and engineers.
In this paper, we present an area-efficient pipeline-balancing CORDIC architecture, and in 16-bit computer, the Bit Error Position (BEP) of the proposed architecture has been improved with no performance penalty.
In FFT processor, the word length of the machine is configurable, for sake of clarity, the implementation of a 16-bit computer is described here as an example, and the complement of decimal 1 is represented as 16'b0100 0000 0000 0000, of which the most significant bit is the sign of data.
The company sold one of the first successful CAD products, Hanratty's Automated Drafting and Machining software, or ADAM, which ran on any 16-bit computer. The company supplied code to the likes of McDonnell Douglas, Computervision, Gerber Scientific, and Control Data to power their own products, which eventually mutated into name-brand CAD software available today.
The three movements are tied together with a 16-bit computer. (CIRCLE 77)
On a 16-bit computer, we hesitate to recommend the general use of any simple MLCG with m < 2.sup.15., since the lattice structure is too coarse and the period is too short.
Two new generators, produced by combining some MLCGs retained in Section 4, are proposed in Section 5, one for 32-bit computers and the other for 16-bit computers. Both have been submitted to a battery of statistical tests and their empirical behavior is highly satisfactory.
For 16-bit computers, we suggest l = 3 and pick the three MLCGs defined by m.sub.1 = 32363, a.sub.1 = 157, m.sub.2 = 31727, a.sub.2 = 146, m.sub.3 = 31657 and a.sub.3 = 142.
Figure 4 gives a portable code for the other proposed combined generator for 16-bit computers. It assumes that integers in the range [-32363, 32363] are well represented.
"We knew that even 16-bit computers, which had 640K of available address space, would be adequate for only four or five years," Gates said in a 1996 interview (http://go2sm.com/gates640).