16-bit computing

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16-bit computing

CPUs that process 16 bits as a single unit, compared to 8, 32 or 64. The first personal computers in the late 1970s used 8-bit CPUs but migrated to 16 bits with the IBM PC in 1981. In the mid-1980s, PCs jumped to 32 bits with the Intel 386, and the Mac debuted with the 32-bit Motorola 68000 CPU. See 8088, 386 and 68000.

The 16-bit CPUs are still used as embedded processors in myriad products that do not require the higher speed. However, over the years, a lot of design effort went into 32-bit CPUs, making them faster, more efficient, smaller and less expensive and competitive with 16-bit CPUs for numerous embedded applications. See 8-bit computing, 32-bit computing and bit specifications.


References in periodicals archive ?
The C8 is powered by the DX image processors, which offer high-quality scaling, an unlimited pixel count (by stacking multiple processors), auto redundancy, and 16-bit processing per color.
State-of-the-art DSPs - referred to as "vecom" chips in Europe have faster processing speeds than ever and 16-bit processing power, which has led to finer control algorithms.
Use 16-bit processing technology and the new PANTONE[R] PLUS SERIES spot color matching system for wide format output
An increasing number of embedded-control applications require higher performance 16-bit processing," said Derek Carlson, vice president of Microchip Development Tools.
The Solar Series display is able to handle 16-bit processing for HDR signals, producing an astounding 65,536 shades per color, smashing the number of colors (1,024) shown by the most advanced current displays.
Full 16-bit processing (65,536 shades per color) and widest range of displayable colors
CAMBRIDGE, England -- Cambridge Consultants has launched its next generation XAP processor core - XAP5 - offering wireless and sensor chip designers an advanced level of 16-bit processing performance combined with low energy consumption and efficient use of low cost memory, making it ideally suited for cost-sensitive high-volume products.
Support for 12-Color Printers and 16-Bit Processing Make Evolution RIP Powerful Medium- and Wide-Format Printer Engine
The new graphics raster image processor (RIP) from DigiFab Systems boasts smoother continuous tones, support for 12-color printers, and 16-bit processing capabilities.
It will feature native DICOM interface, automatic quality control, 12 bit grayscale imaging with 16-bit processing and will integrate easily into the Agfa network environment.
ML9508MC), defines high-end applications as those requiring 16-bit processing or greater (i.